Murderers' brother Kris Malavin admits attempted murder

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The brother of two killers has admitted attempting to murder a key witness who helped convict them.

Kris Malavin, 27, drove his car over 54-year-old James McGregor in Maryhill Road, Glasgow, on 17 January.

The High Court in Glasgow heard how the victim suffered internal bleeding and fractures to his pelvis, leg and hip.

In 2010 Mr McGregor gave evidence against Angus and Zac Malavin who were jailed for life for murdering his friend Andrew Curran.

Judge Lord Jones deferred sentence until October.

Street confrontation

The court heard how Malavin was driving a silver Audi A3 in which his brother Zico Malavin, 19, was a passenger.

He saw Mr McGregor standing at a bus stop and performed a u-turn before Zico Malavin got out the car and exchanged words with Mr McGregor.

The 54-year-old ran off but was struck by the Audi car, throwing him backwards. He then got up and began shouting at the car driver.

As he did this, the Audi struck him once again pinning him against a parked taxi.

The court heard that Malavin then reversed the car and Mr McGregor fell onto the road.

Malavin manoeuvred his car so it was facing Mr McGregor and drove over his legs twice before driving off at speed.

Attack witnessed

Mr McGregor was left lying in the road screaming in pain. The incident was witnessed by a number of motorists and pedestrians who were in the area.

The court heard that Mr McGregor had to have an operation to stop the bleeding and have a pin inserted in his right leg.

He was unable to walk for 16 weeks but is now able to walk short distances with a stick.

He has been left with a limp and will require a hip replacement in the future.

The court was told that the background to the murder attempt was a long-running and on-going feud between the Malavin and Curran families.

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