Teenage graffiti 'artist' Ryan Gilhooly sentenced

A teenage graffiti 'artist' who admitted a string of vandalism charges which caused almost £7,000 in damage has been told to carry out unpaid work.

Ryan Gilhooly, from Clydebank, West Dunbartonshire, vandalised locations in and around the Glasgow area.

The 18-year-old admitted eight charges of malicious damage using spray paint, three graffiti charges using a marker pen and seven breaches of bail.

At Glasgow Sheriff Court he was told to carry out 180 hours of unpaid work.

As part of the two-year community payback order, he has to stay within his home address between 23:00 and 06:00 and not to further offend.

'Causing havoc'

Sentencing Gilhooly, Sheriff Bill Totten told him: "The real crucial issue in this case is whether you have learned from that experience, whether you have grown up and whether you are going to stop behaving like this."

He added: "Do not graffiti, paint or deface any property which does not belong to you without the express permission of the owner."

The court heard that Gilhooly sprayed "RAIO" and "CHS" - which stands for Causing Havoc Squad - in a spate of incidents between September 2012 and December 2013.

Among the places he sprayed was a shelter at Drumchapel train station, a wall at Partick train station, a van at Yoker Depot and an underpass and wall at Hyndland train station.

He also targeted a wall at Bearsden Academy with the vandalism.

In July last year, Gilhooly was ordered to carry out 240 hours unpaid work after admitting six charges of "wilfully or recklessly destroying or damaging the property belonging to another", and a breach of bail for being in Glasgow Central Station after being given a condition not to go there.

He caused £2,400 of damage by tagging trains, a junction box at Garscadden train station and a train station building between February and June 2012.

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