Residents fight over sewage stink at Wishaw development

Housing development in Wishaw The site in Wishaw was developed by Bett Homes and Stewart Milne

A faulty sewage system at a new North Lanarkshire housing development has left dozens of residents complaining about foul smells and blocked toilets.

About 30 householders have experienced problems over the past four years at the site in Wishaw that was developed by Bett Homes and Stewart Milne.

Both firms blame "foreign matter" from outside their sites "entering the foul water system" and causing blockages.

They have said they "remain committed to resolving these issues".

One resident, Jacqui Milne, told BBC Scotland that she bought her new house from Bett Homes in 2009.

Toilets blocked

She said she expected luxury and convenience but instead had faced ongoing problems with the estate's sewage system.

"It got to the stage where we couldn't flush the toilet, we can't use the washing machine because the washing machine drains up the way out the kitchen sink," she said

"I was told at one point to go to Asda to use the toilets.

"It's very disappointing when you've bought a new home that you don't have basic functions in your house."

Start Quote

Bett Homes and Stewart Milne Homes remain committed to resolving these issues and are hopeful that a solution can be realised soon”

End Quote Bett Homes spokesman

North Lanarkshire Councillor Robert McKendrick said had been aware of residents' concerns at the Wishaw development "for quite some time" and they way they had been treated was "a scandal".

Referring to the developers, he said: "I would like to see them come on site and speak to the people and let them know what they're doing and get it fixed immediately.

"I think we need to involve all agencies here and get them on board and get this resolved as soon as possible."

A spokesman for Bett Homes said that the foul water system which services its Aspect development in Wishaw includes a waste water pumping station.

This handles sewage from the Bett Homes and Stewart Milne Homes developments and from neighbouring residential properties and a private residential care home.

The spokesman said: "Bett Homes and Stewart Milne have had the foul water system - including the pumping station - examined and it has been confirmed that it is built to the necessary standard and is not the cause of the breakages.

"It is our understanding that these breakages are caused by foreign matter from outside of the Bett Homes and Stewart Milne developments entering the foul water system.

Residents meeting

"Bett Homes and Stewart Milne Homes have been consulting with Scottish Water and managing the situation over a sustained period.

"Bett Homes and Stewart Milne Homes remain committed to resolving these issues and are hopeful that a solution can be realised soon."

A spokesman for Stewart Milne Homes added: "Stewart Milne Homes is absolutely committed to resolving the drainage issues at the Wishaw development.

"We are working closely with Bett Homes, and the construction directors from both companies are meeting with John Pentland MSP, along with residents of both developments, to discuss the future maintenance of the pumping station.

"Following the meeting, all residents will be notified of the planned course of action."

The meeting, which will also be attended by North Lanarkshire Council and Scottish Water, is due to take place on Friday.

More on This Story

The BBC is not responsible for the content of external Internet sites

BBC Glasgow & West

Weather

Glasgow

15 °C 8 °C

Features

  • Peaky Blinders publicity shotBrum do

    Why is the Birmingham accent so difficult to mimic?


  • Oliver CromwellA brief history

    The 900 year story behind the creation of a UK parliament


  • Image of Ankor Wat using lidarJungle Atlantis

    How lasers have revealed an ancient city beneath the forest


  • TheatreBard taste? Watch

    Are trailer videos on social media spoiling theatre?


  • Agents with the US Secret Service, such as this one, are responsible for guarding the presidentHard at work

    White House break-in adds to Secret Service woes


BBC © 2014 The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.