Stuart Rodger sentenced for shouting at David Cameron

David Cameron Rodger targeted a speech in Glasgow by Prime Minister David Cameron

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A man who shouted "no public sector cuts" at David Cameron during a speech in Glasgow has been ordered to carry out 100 hours of community service.

Stuart Rodger, 23, hid in a toilet at the Grand Central Hotel before bursting into a room where the prime minister was addressing Conservatives.

He was tackled by aides before being led away by Special Branch.

Rodger, from Fife, was previously fined £200 for hitting Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg with blue paint in Glasgow.

During an appearance at Glasgow Sheriff Court, the former Lib-Dem political activist admitted behaving in a threatening or abusive manner by violating a security cordon, shouting and failing to desist, attempting to approach Mr Cameron and causing fear and alarm.

He was handed a community payback order with the condition he has to carry out 100 hours of community service.

Security cordon

This was reduced from 150 because of his guilty plea.

Procurator fiscal depute John Slowey told the court Rodger hid in a toilet prior to making his entrance on 31 July.

It was heard he shouted "No ifs, not buts, no public sector cuts."

Mr Rodger's lawyer said the "security cordon" he got past was someone asking if he had a pass, and Mr Rodger had only gone a few metres into the room.

Rodger was previously fined £200 after breaching the peace by hitting Mr Clegg with blue paint during a visit to Glasgow earlier this year.

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