New £74m Riverside Museum attracts 500,000 visitors

 
Riverside Museum The Riverside and Tall Ship Glenlee are popular attractions on the River Clyde

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Glasgow's new Riverside Museum has welcomed 500,000 visitors since it opened on 21 June.

The £74m venue, on the banks of the River Clyde, has averaged almost 10,000 visitors a day, with its busiest day - 25 June - attracting 15,000 people.

The facility houses more than 3,000 exhibits in over 150 interactive displays, showing the city's transport, shipbuilding and engineering heritage.

The Tall Ship Glenlee is also berthed alongside the museum.

The 500,000th visitor on 11 August were Ronnie and Jannette Kerr from Aberdour and their children Joanna, seven, and eight-year-old Elizabeth.

'Fantastic building'

They received gifts from the museum shop and will be invited for a meal in the restaurant.

Mr Kerr said: "This was a real surprise and I am absolutely delighted.

"My dad worked in the yards at Yarrows and I would have loved to have shown him round here.

"It is a fantastic building and they have done a great job. I have been to the old museums at Kelvin Hall and Albert Drive but this building is something else. We really enjoyed our visit."

Glasgow City Council leader Gordon Matheson said the Riverside had been "a huge hit" since it opened.

"We knew just how much visitors loved the Museum of Transport at Kelvin Hall but even so, the reaction to the Riverside Museum has been phenomenal," he said.

"The feedback from people has been overwhelmingly positive and we are already seeing visitors returning time and again to enjoy Glasgow's latest attraction."

 

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  • rate this
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    Comment number 12.

    We visited today and thought it was brilliant, my son (6) loved it, the displays are great, some of the displays are high up, which means you are looking at the underside of a car, but I really have no idea what people are moaning about? Best of all it's free!! The only down side we could see was, when it's crazy busy like to day, the car park is a nightmare and the cafe is too small...

  • rate this
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    Comment number 11.

    I tried really hard to like this new museum but I think the designer forgot what the main objective was here: as a museum of transport, the attraction is seeing the machines up close, looking through the windows and under the bonnets. The cars - and even the bikes! - are way out of reach and the available space is cramped and poorly laid out.
    I'll still go but I won't enjoy it!

  • rate this
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    Comment number 10.

    One of the chief reasons I visited (often!) the old museum was to see the old classic cars...being able to get up close, peer into the interiors and feel you had stepped back in time, now with the cars on the walls (how ridiculous is that to start with?) that is now impossible.

    Pointless.

  • rate this
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    Comment number 9.

    It is a good concept but way too small. Its a shame that the building is more of a talking point than the contents.

  • rate this
    +3

    Comment number 8.

    Building wrong shape, more form over function. Terrible colour inside. No old cinema (unless I missed it) Old street/underground do not have the same atmosphere. Too little space for exhibits. They should have used the main Kelvin Hall for the museum. Moved the sports facility down to the waterfront. This would let visitors go between the Museum/Art Gallery and Transport Museum.

 

Comments 5 of 12

 

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