Edinburgh cyclists launch interactive 'innertube' map

Cyclists in Edinburgh are getting their own hi-tech travel service

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A map detailing Edinburgh's extensive cycle path network has been developed by local enthusiasts.

A team from the bicycle recycling charity the Bike Station have launched the 'Innertube', taking inspiration from London's underground map.

The interactive map, which incorporates disused rail lines and park paths, will be updated by 10 "ambassadors".

They will patrol the route and update the map posting pictures and incident reports using smart phones.

Mark Sydenham, who developed the idea, said he hoped the initiative would help the city's 150,000 cyclists to traverse its streets away from the dangers of motorised traffic.

He said: "It's a conceptual map just like the London underground map so it's not geographical. It just represents the 70-odd kilometres that there are of Edinburgh's completely off-road, traffic-free pathways."

The map details dozens of routes including routes through Haymarket, Leith, Newhaven, Crammond and Balerno.

The charity will also be working with the Edinburgh and Lothian Green Space Trust to identify what paths need conservation or maintenance work to improve the local area.

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