Ryder Cup bank-note design unveiled

ryder cup bank note back

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The design of a special edition Ryder Cup £5 bank-note has been unveiled.

The prestigious golf competition between teams from Europe and the United States will take place at Gleneagles in Perthshire in September.

The commemorative bank note, which can be used as normal currency anywhere in the UK, will be available to ticket-holders at the event.

The memento will be on sale online as part of official Ryder Cup commemorative packages, which cost £20.

The notes will not be in general circulation, however they will be legal currency.

The Ryder Cup, which is held every two years, has become one of the world's most famous sporting events and attracts a global audience.

Richard Hills, Europe's Ryder Cup director, said: "Bank notes are part of a stable of collectible items that people love to buy, or give as a gift, to commemorate major events.

"They don't come much bigger than The Ryder Cup and we know that many people will want that special memento to mark the time it came to Scotland."

The bank note will be printed on hybrid paper, a mix of traditional cotton paper and polyester plastic materials, which should make it more durable and resistant to staining.

On the front of the note, the design includes a see-through window in the shape of The Ryder Cup.

The banknote will be the first to contain the signature of new RBS chief executive Ross McEwan.

Ken Barclay, RBS Chairman in Scotland, said: "RBS has a long history of issuing commemorative bank notes and supporting golf in Scotland and it means a lot to be able to mark The Ryder Cup's arrival here for the first time in over 40 years."

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