Scotland

Tiny coin to mark the Queen's Diamond Jubilee

Media captionTo fill the same space as a regular pound coin would require 2.6 trillion of the tiny diamond objects

Scientists at Glasgow University have marked the Queen's Diamond Jubilee by creating the world's smallest commemorative coin.

The Queen's image has been etched on a sliver of diamond 200 times thinner that a human hair.

The coin is so small that it cannot be seen by even the most powerful optical microscope.

To fill the same space as a regular pound coin would require 2.6 trillion of the tiny diamond objects.

The royal image was created by the university's James Watt Nanofabrication Centre.

Unique properties

They etched it onto the diamond using an advanced polymer and a stream of electrons.

Dr David Moran of Glasgow University said: "We're proud to be celebrating the Queen's Diamond Jubilee with the creation of the world's smallest diamond coin.

"Diamond is not just an attractive material for use in jewellery; it also has a range of unique physical properties which make it ideal for use in a range of advanced fields of engineering.

"It's an excellent thermal conductor and has a high tolerance for radiation, which makes it perfect for use in applications such as electronic transistors and robust enough to be used in challenging environments such as outer space."

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