In full: Prime Minister's Questions: David Cameron v Ed Miliband

  1.  
    1252:

    With that in mind, it is time to end our first weekly coverage of Prime Minister's Questions. Has Ed Miliband made a resolution not to joke? Is points-scoring over? Has Punch and Judy ended forever? Have we heard such commitments from leaders of the opposition before? Has anything really changed? We'll find out next Wednesday. Please join us then. In the meantime, you can follow the latest goings-on at Westminster on BBC Democracy Live and on the BBC Parliament channel.

     
  2.  
    1249:

    The studio debate about the nature of Prime Minister's Questions continues. Daily Politics host Andrew Neil, a keen follower of international politics, questions whether it has become "too parochial" and whether there could be more focus on foreign affairs.

     
  3.  
    1247:

    On Daily Politics Nick Robinson disagrees with Sajid Javid, saying he has "no doubt" Ed Miliband is trying to change the nature of Prime Minister's Questions.

     
  4.  
    1246:

    Treasury minister Sajid Javid argues that the death of Paul Goggins was largely responsible for setting the time of today's session rather than a drive by Ed Miliband for seriousness.

     
  5.  
    1246:

    Chuka Umunna continues to discuss the nature of PMQs. He says there are questions for the media as well as politicians, arguing that a more serious tone is not as good on TV as the usual Punch-and-Judy affair.

     
  6.  
    1245:

    Shadow business secretary Chuka Umunna says most people in the country are not watching PMQs (the real connoisseurs are reading about it here, he fails to add).

     
  7.  
    1242:

    On Daily Politics, BBC political editor Nick Robinson says of today's low-key tone that, before Christmas, Ed Miliband was worried that the tone of PMQs was getting "out of control". He wonders whether the opposition leader has talked to the PM about the situation.

     
  8.  
    1242:

    In the Commons now Northern Ireland Secretary Theresa Villiers is making a statement on the Haass talks. You can watch that live on the Democracy Live Commons video on this page.

     
  9.  
    1240: Chris Mason Political correspondent, BBC News

    The Speaker regularly says Prime Minister's Questions will carry on as long as necessary when the House has been rowdy. It wasn't very rowdy today at all, but PMQs still rattled on until nearly twenty to one.

     
  10.  
    1239:

    Labour's Ian Davidson raises laughs when he says he wants to "agree" with the PM over the Scottish independence TV debate. He adds that the "last person" that pro-union Scots want to represent them is a "Tory toff from the Home Counties". The PM says he "accepts every part" of Mr Davidson's argument, adding that he accepted his appeal didn't stretch to all parts. That ends Prime Minister's Questions for this week.

     
  11.  
    1236: Chris Mason Political correspondent, BBC News

    Despite the sombre tone today, there has still been sparks of typically partisan PMQs language today. The Prime Minister describing the SNP's Westminster leader Angus Robertson as Alex Salmond's "lackey" a case in point.

     
  12.  
    1236:

    Conservative James Clappison says the government should keep a cap on the number of economic migrants from outside the EU. The PM says it will do so.

     
  13.  
    1235:

    The SNP's Angus Robertson urges the PM to take part in a televised debate with Scottish First Minister Alex Salmond ahead of the independence referendum. David Cameron says the SNP is losing the debate, but the debate should take place between the leaders of the "yes" and "no" campaigns.

     
  14.  
    1235: Carole Walker Political correspondent, BBC News

    tweets: PM says cuts to winter fuel allowance would save v small amount of money - further hint Tories may pledge to keep it #pmqs

     
  15.  
    1233:

    The PM says it is vital that pensioners have dignity and security in old age and the "triple lock" on pension rises is vital to this.

     
  16.  
    1232:

    DUP MP Nigel Dodds says Paul Goggins was a friend to the people of Northern Ireland. Mr Goggins served as a Northern Ireland minister in Gordon Brown's government. Mr Cameron thanks Mr Dodds for his comments.

     
  17.  
    1232:

    Conservative Robert Buckland says Paul Goggins' work on the reform of the law on child neglect "will go on". Moving on, he calls for legal highs to be banned. David Cameron says the government is doing this as quickly as possible.

     
  18.  
    1230: Chris Mason Political correspondent, BBC News

    A very, very loyal question from Dan Byles, the Conservative MP for Warwickshire North. The Prime Minister referred to a recent visit to the seat, which Mr Byles holds with a majority you could fit onto a coach - just 54. Expect plenty more politicians there in the next year and a bit.

     
  19.  
    1229:

    Conservative Dan Byles praises the "rebalancing" of the economy. The prime minister says businesses like consistent policy. Mr Cameron also notes that Labour MPs' questions suggest that despite it being a new year "it's the same old Labour".

     
  20.  
    1229:

    Labour's Paul Blomfield urges the PM to make no further cuts to services for the sick and disabled. David Cameron says the government is putting more into the NHS, having taken "tough decisions" on welfare.

     
  21.  
    1228:
    David Cameron David Cameron takes questions from MPs across the Commons
     
  22.  
    1227:

    Conservative Iain Stewart says the Royal pardon granted to WWII code-breaker Alan Turing means justice. David Cameron says there is no doubt the work Mr Turing and others did at Bletchley Park was instrumental in winning the war.

     
  23.  
    1226:

    Labour's John Mann says police are having to patrol villages on public transport because of cuts. He asks whether they should go upstairs on buses or sit downstairs with people they have arrested, or avoid making arrests. The PM responds by saying that crime in Mr Mann's Bassetlaw constituency is down by 27%.

     
  24.  
    1225:

    Lib Dem Tim Farron calls Paul Goggins one of the most effective ministers the House has seen. He says some of the flooding in his constituency is due to climate change. The PM says he suspects that this is indeed a contributory factor to recent weather events.

     
  25.  
    1222:

    Labour's Nick Smith says foreign technology companies are paying "even less" in tax. The PM says that is a "little unfair" and progress is being made.

     
  26.  
    1222:

    Conservative Cheryl Gillan says long-term economic policies are needed. David Cameron concurs.

     
  27.  
    1221:
    Ed Miliband There was none of the usual jeering, shouting (or hand gestures) during the leaders' exchanges, following the news of MP Paul Goggins' death
     
  28.  
    1220:

    Labour's Debbie Abrahams calls Paul Goggins "a lovely, lovely man".

     
  29.  
    1219:

    Conservative Penny Mordaunt urges the PM to send a message that her home city of Portsmouth is ready for more business investment. Mr Cameron says the City Deal scheme will do this.

     
  30.  
    1219:

    Labour's Katy Clark asks what the government will do to close a "loophole" allowing agency workers to earn less than full-time staff. The PM says it was introduced under the last government with TUC backing.

     
  31.  
    1217:

    Conservative Anne McIntosh pays tribute to the late Labour MP Paul Goggins.

     
  32.  
    1216:

    Fixed-odds betting machines are concentrated in poor areas, says Ed Miliband, and he asks what will happen. The PM says the Labour should input ideas for the review. That ends the leaders' debate for today.

     
  33.  
    1215:

    Ed Miliband says his party didn't go far enough in government to limit fixed-odds betting machines, saying councils should have more powers to deal with them. The PM says the machines were introduced under Labour and there are now fewer than when Mr Miliband's party was in power.

     
  34.  
    1215: Chris Mason Political correspondent, BBC News

    Ed Miliband has split his questions - his next topic is fixed odds betting machines. Labour would like to increase the regulation of them.

     
  35.  
    1214:

    Labour leader Ed Miliband is back on his feet. He asks about fixed-odds betting terminals, which will be debated later in the Commons. David Cameron says there are problems but the review currently under way must be listened to.

     
  36.  
    1214: Chris Mason Political correspondent, BBC News

    The beginnings of a return to the normal tone of PMQs with some cheers and jeering - on the subject of the deficit and welfare.

     
  37.  
    1213:

    Conservative George Hollingbery attacks Labour over its spending and debt record. So does the PM.

     
  38.  
    1213:

    Labour's Diane Abbott says "hard-working families" face losing their homes as a result of housing benefit cuts. Mr Cameron says they will benefit from income tax changes and the welfare system needs to change.

     
  39.  
    1213:

    Conservative Tobias Ellwood praises emergency services in Dorset for their work to cope with floods.

     
  40.  
    1213: Chris Mason Political correspondent, BBC News

    Beyond the tributes, the focus so far has been the big domestic news story over Christmas and New Year - the floods.

     
  41.  
    1209: Chris Mason Political correspondent, BBC News

    Veteran Labour backbencher Dennis Skinner is in his usual place. Whilst most MPs sit back on the benches, he is, as ever, perched on the end of his seat bolt upright.

     
  42.  
    1209:

    The Labour leader asks for a full assessment of the floods and plans in place by the end of this month. David Cameron says this will happen.

     
  43.  
    1208:

    Ed Miliband asks why energy firms took as long as they did to restore power after the storms over the Christmas period. The PM says some of them did not have enough people on duty.

     
  44.  
    1208:

    David Cameron urges members of the public to follow the advice of emergency services and the government as floods continue.

     
  45.  
    1208: Chris Mason Political correspondent, BBC News

    A very sombre start to PMQs, in a very quiet House, given the announcement this morning of the death of Labour MP Paul Goggins.

     
  46.  
    1207:

    Ed Miliband asks for an update on the effects of the floods and resources in place. The PM replies that there are 104 flood warnings in place in England and Wales and 186 flood alerts.

     
  47.  
    1207:
    Packed Commons Standing room only - with Education Secretary Michael Gove taking the corner slot
     
  48.  
    1205:

    Ed Miliband added: "The Labour Party has lost one of its own and one of its best."

     
  49.  
    1205:

    Ed Miliband calls Paul Goggins a man of principle who had the respect, trust and affection of all sides when he was a Northern Ireland minister.

     
  50.  
    1205:

    Labour leader Ed Miliband pays tribute to Captain Richard Holloway and the victims of the US helicopter crash in Norfolk.

     
  51.  
    1205: Chris Mason Political correspondent, BBC News

    Standing room only as usual for PMQs. But not even the Education Secretary Michael Gove has a seat - he is standing behind Tory backbencher Simon Burns, who does have a seat.

     
  52.  
    1204:

    Conservative MP Simon Burns also praises Paul Goggins. He urges the government to stick to its long-term economic plan. David Cameron says it will do so.

     
  53.  
    1203:

    The PM says Labour MP Paul Goggins was liked by those across the House.

     
  54.  
    1202: Chris Mason Political correspondent, BBC News

    The Prime Minister stands up at the Despatch Box, wearing glasses. He reflects on the "sudden death" of the "kind and brilliant" Labour MP Paul Goggins, who has died.

     
  55.  
    1202:

    We are under way. David Cameron pays tribute to Captain Richard Holloway, killed in Afghanistan on 23 December. He also expresses sympathy for the victims of the US helicopter crash in Norfolk.

     
  56.  
    1200:
    David Cameron David Cameron, seated on the right, sporting glasses as he prepares for the session
     
  57.  
    1200:

    As Wales Questions comes to and end, the volume level is pretty high in the Commons.

     
  58.  
    1158:
    Speaker John Bercow Speaker John Bercow began the day's proceedings in the Commons with a tribute to Paul Goggins
     
  59.  
    1157:

    Just a few minutes to go and the House is about two-thirds full.

     
  60.  
    1153:

    Some more of Speaker John Bercow's tribute to Labour MP Paul Goggins: "He always played the ball, never the man or the woman. An outstanding public servant who came into politics for all the right reasons, Paul's passing is a loss on so many levels."

     
  61.  
    1150:

    On BBC Two's Daily Politics, Treasury minister Sajid Javid says the Conservatives can only set out fuller details of the £12bn in cuts from the welfare budget announced earlier this week by Chancellor George Osborne at a date nearer the election.

     
  62.  
    1147:

    Conservative MPs Simon Burns and Tobias Ellwood are top of the ballot of MPs to ask a question of David Cameron. They are followed by Labour's Diane Abbott.

     
  63.  
    1146:

    Things are already under way in the Commons, with Wales questions. Speaker John Bercow has already extended his sympathy to the family of Paul Goggins, saying he had "never heard an ill word used against him".

     
  64.  
    1145:

    Some backbench MPs could raise the subject of immigration, particularly in light of the removal of working restrictions on Romanians and Bulgarians on 1 January.

     
  65.  
    1144:

    The recent and ongoing floods are also a likely topic of discussion during the session.

     
  66.  
    1143:

    There is no shortage of issues which could come up when the leaders clash. The economic news continues to be brighter - with house prices continuing to rise. On Monday the Conservative suggested more welfare cuts after the next election to finish off the deficit. Labour continues to focus on cost of living issues and also has a debate later on Wednesday on the growth of fixed-odds betting terminals in bookmakers.

     
  67.  
    1140:

    Labour leader Ed Miliband has paid tribute to Paul Goggins, calling him "dignified, humane, wise and loyal". Several other MPs are expected to pay their respects during Prime Minister's Questions.

     
  68.  
    1138:

    The mood is expected to be sombre this week after the news this morning of the death of Paul Goggins, a Labour MP popular across the House of Commons. The 60-year-old died just over a week after being taken ill while out jogging with his son.

     
  69.  
    1137:

    Hello and welcome to the first Prime Minister's Questions of 2014. The session begins at noon and is due to last for 30 minutes. If you're new to it, it is a weekly event at which Prime Minister David Cameron faces questions from MPs. The only MP able to ask more than one question is Labour leader Ed Miliband, who gets to ask six. His clash with the Prime Minister normally begins in the first five minutes of the session.

     

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