Fixed-odds betting machines 'concerning', say ministers

 
Fixed odds betting terminal Bookmakers say few people play for high stakes

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Ministers have said the growth of high-stakes roulette machines on the High Street is "concerning" and they do not rule out action to restrict them.

Culture Minister Helen Grant told MPs their future was "unresolved" and bookmakers must take immediate action to increase protection for players.

People can wager £100 every 20 seconds on fixed-odds betting terminals.

Labour said they were "an example of David Cameron's Britain" and councils should have new powers to curb them.

But following a Commons debate, Labour's call for local authorities to be given new powers to restrict the growth of the machines was defeated by 314 to 232 votes.

There are more than 33,000 fixed-odds betting terminals in the UK.

'Debt and misery'

The last Labour government relaxed the gambling laws, allowing bookmakers to start installing them.

Fixed odds betting terminals

  • Fixed odds betting terminals were launched in 1999 after then chancellor Gordon Brown scrapped tax on individual bets in favour of taxing bookmakers' profits
  • High stakes casino-style gambling is banned from High Streets but fixed odds betting terminals used remote servers so that the gaming was not taking place on the premises
  • After the 2005 Gambling Act, fixed odds betting terminals were given legal backing and put under the same regulatory framework as fruit machines
  • They stopped using remote servers but stakes were limited to £100 and terminals to four per betting shop
  • Punters can place a £100 stake every 20 seconds
  • According to the Gambling Commission there are 33,284 fixed-odds betting terminals across the UK
  • The average weekly profit per fixed odds betting terminals in 2012 was £825, up from £760 in 2011, according to the Gambling Commission
  • The number of betting shops in the UK increased from 8,862 in 2009 to 9,031 in 2013. The big three operators have plans to open hundreds of new shops although many independent operators have closed

But the party has accused the gambling industry of exploiting those changes to target poorer parts of the country,

It says fixed-odds betting terminals are acting as a magnet for crime and anti-social behaviour and local authorities should be given new powers to deal with "clusters" of shops opening together.

They would also review the number of high-speed, high-stakes fixed-odds betting terminals allowed on bookmakers' premises and would take steps to make the machines less addictive by requiring pop-ups and breaks in play.

Shadow culture minister Clive Efford said the last government had always maintained the machines should be kept under review.

The "world had changed" since they were first licensed, he said, with the online gambling industry now worth more than £2bn.

"These machines are an example of Cameron's Britain - one rule for constituents and another for big business which operate the betting shops," he said.

Another Labour MP, Brian Donohue, said fixed-odds betting terminals had been "likened to cocaine" as they were "absolutely and totally addictive".

Ministers insist that local authorities can already reject applications for new gambling premises and review existing licences.

But Ms Grant acknowledged the growth of the machines was "concerning" and she expected the industry to introduce voluntary player protection measures, such as suspensions in play and automatic alerts when stakes hit a certain level, by March.

She said the government was waiting for the findings of a study into "how [the machines] are used and the real impact on players" before deciding what further action may be needed.

Ed Miliband outside a bookmakers in north London last month Ed Miliband says bookmakers are targeting disadvantaged communities

"There is no green light for these machines. Their future is unresolved pending the research we have started," she told MPs.

Labour, she added, had liberalised gambling laws and accused them of "rank hypocrisy, total cynicism and outright opportunism".

"Labour bought these machines into being and they have the audacity to bring forward a motion blaming the government for any harm caused," she said.

'Working class pursuit'

The gambling industry insists it does not target deprived areas and has introduced a code of conduct for player protection and responsible gaming.

"Betting is a pursuit enjoyed by millions of working class people throughout Britain and we seek to reach the widest audience possible by being present on High Streets," the Association of British Bookmakers said.

"We accept there are concerns about these gaming machines and are always open to a constructive dialogue with politicians about the appropriate powers for local authorities."

It added: "The claims of widespread problem gambling on machines is just not supported by evidence. The industry continues to develop its approach to harm mitigation for the small number of gamblers who do experience problems."

MPs have previously rejected calls from Labour to reduce the maximum stake from £100 to £2 and to cut the top prize from the current £500.

 

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  • rate this
    +8

    Comment number 182.

    I watch unemployed people everyday in the arcade where I work, we don't have F O B T but we do have £500 jackpot m/s to watch them pour money in, is really upsetting. We are supposed to offer them a leaflet about gambling, if we think they have a problem, I did, once, the outcome was not nice, sadly, they try to chase losses

  • rate this
    +15

    Comment number 137.

    As an unemployed 18 year old in the 70s I foolishly walked into an amusement arcade after cashing my fortnightly Giro. Two hours later I left without a penny to my name but with a valuable lesson learned about gambling with Monet needed for essentials.

    Unfortunately some never learn this lesson and fixed odds machines rely on that.

  • rate this
    -2

    Comment number 136.

    I think they should concern themselves more with the group of people who are holding these poor gamblers at knife and gunpoint and physically pressing them into these shops and then forcing the money out of their pockets and into these machines...

    Yes it can be an addiction but at some point you have to decide what's important, your personal thrills, or your house, kids, wife/hubby and cat/dog.

  • rate this
    +3

    Comment number 125.

    I dont gamble so it wont directly affect me, but I have seen the effect that gambling addiction can have on a family. It's a marriage and home breaker just like drug or alcohol addiction and can end up with suicide. My personal view would be to ban these machines entirely but I'm sure somebody will find reasons why thats not reasonable or removes somebodys human rights.

  • rate this
    +12

    Comment number 33.

    I've had problems with gambling for a number of years now and without doubt these machines are by far cause the greatest amount of stress and distress. Knowing and having spoken to a number of Managers within these shops by far the greatest amount of issues with gambling, including those that self exclude, are fixed odds betting terminals related.

 

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