Viewpoints: Is coalition politics here to stay?

 
David Cameron and Nick Clegg outside No. 10

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Deputy PM Nick Clegg says the Lib Dem party is committed to a full five-year term of coalition government. Business Secretary Vince Cable says it may break up before reaching full term. Is coalition politics here to stay?

Mr Clegg told the BBC's Andrew Marr programme recently that coalition governments will be more likely in future than traditional winner-takes-all politics.

"If we go back to the bad old days, not of coalition or balanced politics, but of either the left or the right dominating government on their own, you will get a recovery which is neither fair nor sustainable," he said.

But his Lib Dem colleague Vince Cable later suggested that the arrangement could break up before its five-year term is over.

So is coalition politics set to be a permanent feature of UK politics, or will it revert to traditional single party governments? Several experts give their views.

Start Quote

Katie Ghose

Voters are behaving more like consumers... less loyal to one of the two major parties”

End Quote
Katie Ghose, chief executive of the Electoral Reform Society

It's extremely likely, even under the current first-past-the-post system, that coalitions will become more common because voters have changed.

Voters are behaving more like consumers these days; they are less loyal to one of the two major parties, and they're more keen to support a wider range of parties and independents.

Independents and minor parties won a larger percentage of the vote - 12% - at the last general election than they ever had before.

So voters have changed and as a result politics is changing. And that is why we are seeing, and will see, more coalition governments at Westminster in the future.

Katie Ghose

  • Chief executive of the Electoral Reform Society
  • Former chair of the YES! To Fairer Votes campaign in the 2011 Alternative Vote referendum

It is still possible for one of the major parties to win outright but I think it is more likely that parties are going to have to share power going forward.

In the last general election in 2010, we saw that the vote share for the major parties combined was 65%; so it's because voters have changed that [those] parties will now struggle to win enough support under [the first past the post] system to be the sole party in power.

Start Quote

Ryan Bourne

A party just has to have a broad enough vision that can capture the public's imagination”

End Quote
Ryan Bourne, of the Centre for Policy Studies

There's been a huge collapse in the vote share of the two largest parties. This has been indicative, particularly over the last 20 years, of the two major parties adopting fairly similar policies.

So it's not really a surprise that their combined vote share has fallen when you think that they're trying to attract centre-ground voters.

Voters who traditionally would have voted for those parties have become disillusioned and now vote for minor parties, which has helped to contribute to the fact that we [currently] have a coalition government.

Ryan Bourne

  • Head of economic research at the Centre for Policy Studies
  • The CPS was founded by Margaret Thatcher and Sir Keith Joseph in 1974

And if UKIP does as well as they're currently polling, the two most likely outcomes [in 2015] are probably some sort of coalition government or a Labour majority.

But I don't think this is necessarily a permanent feature [of UK politics]. A party just has to have a broad enough vision that can capture the public's imagination to be able to win an overall majority again.

The potential game changer in all this is the Scottish independence referendum. If [traditionally Labour stronghold] Scotland votes to go independent, we're likely in 2015 to get a Conservative majority government elected in England and Wales.

That could completely end this debate stone dead straight away.

Start Quote

Patrick Dunleavy

Coalition governments could well become a regular feature of British politics”

End Quote
Prof Patrick Dunleavy, co-director of Democratic Audit

There are strong signs that coalition governments could well become a regular feature of British politics. The current government has been unexpectedly resilient, and reasonably effective, and the five-year fixed-term seems to be sticking.

As the election draws nearer in spring 2015 (or perhaps before), we can expect to see a greater degree of tension and divergence between Conservatives and Liberal Democrats. Despite this, it looks likely that there'll be more coalitions in future.

Current opinion polls suggest that in 2015 we look set to see Tories and Labour close together, with a largish UKIP vote and smaller Liberal Democrat share.

Such a result could well bring about another coalition government. Certainly, that seems to be the view of [electoral expert Prof] John Curtice, who wrote recently that no party is well positioned to emerge with an overall majority.

Prof Patrick Dunleavy

  • Co-director of Democratic Audit
  • Professor of Political Science at the London School of Economics.

Coalition governments and multi-party systems are the norm for most European democracies, and the UK has become fairly typical in this regard. We have

  • parties of the strong right and left in UKIP (doing well) and the Greens (lagging behind most European countries)
  • parties of the centre-right and centre-left in the Conservatives and Labour, and
  • a smallish party of the liberal centre in the Liberal Democrats - particularly since they stopped picking up protest votes.

All multi-party systems tend to produce coalition government. Despite our first-past-the-post voting system, the UK is really not much different from the rest of Europe now.

Start Quote

Ben Yong

Increased likelihood of hung parliaments doesn't necessarily mean more coalition governments”

End Quote
Dr Ben Yong, of Queen Mary University of London

Are coalitions here to stay? The current one probably is, at least until the general election in 2015.

The Conservatives, in spite of complaints, have only benefited from their partnership with the Lib Dems; the Lib Dems less so, but there is no good reason to leave the coalition either.

As for the possibility of coalitions in the future, political scientists such as John Curtice have shown that the decline in the number of marginal seats, and the increase of third parties taking a proportion of the total vote, means that hung parliaments are increasingly likely.

Prof Ben Yong

  • Lecturer of public law at Queen Mary University of London
  • Co-author of Politics of Coalition: How the Conservative-Liberal Democrat Government Works

That doesn't mean it's impossible for Labour or the Conservatives to gain a majority - current polls suggest Labour would have enough seats to govern alone if there were to be an election today.

But the increased likelihood of hung parliaments doesn't necessarily mean more coalition governments.

It would depend on parliamentary arithmetic and the mood of the parties: the Conservatives or Labour might prefer to try their luck with minority government - but if they think coalition government is tough, wait till they try governing with a minority.

Start Quote

Harry Phibbs

For the next election a coalition may be rather less likely”

End Quote
Harry Phibbs, Conservative councillor

In a sense we always have coalition governments. Sometimes the coalition - of personal allegiances and ideological factions - is within a political party which forms the government, sometimes it's the more open coalitions between different parties.

This coalition government has really been going remarkably smoothly. The concern that it would prove to be a weak government has proved to be untrue.

There have been plenty of frustrations but David Cameron and Nick Clegg worked together more easily than, for example, Tony Blair and Gordon Brown did or Margaret Thatcher and Geoffrey Howe.

The success does not mean that coalitions will be a regular pattern. That is much more to do with a fluke of democratic process. Nobody votes for a coalition. They vote for a party and then we all have to muddle along with the consequences.

Harry Phibbs

  • An editor and writer for ConservativeHome website
  • Conservative councillor for Hammersmith and Fulham

For the next election a coalition may be rather less likely. This is due to the Lib Dems finding themselves robbed of their status as an opportunistic protest party, with that territory grabbed by UKIP.

In the longer run, however, coalitions will probably return. There is less deference in politics. People are less likely to vote the same way as their parents or spouses. They are more likely to switch. They are more inclined to lose patience with both main parties and look for alternatives. In these fickle conditions democracy may well offer more fluid outcomes.

Start Quote

Mark Ferguson

There's an existential challenge for party politics”

End Quote
Mark Ferguson, editor of LabourList

It's absolutely possible that Labour can win the next election with an outright majority.

But coalitions are more likely right now than they ever were 10, 15, 20 years ago.

There's an existential challenge for party politics in general, and that's hitting the two biggest parties in the country hardest because they're the most established [and] they've been in government when unpopular decisions have been made.

And to be honest, none of the parties have a really good history of reaching out to the public and talking to people in perhaps the way they should be spoken to in the 21st century.

They still quite often run campaigns as they were run in the 1980s and 1990s. In 2013, people interact with news in a completely different way, people interact with politics in a completely different way, and fundamentally people don't join things.

Mark Ferguson

  • Editor of LabourList
  • LabourList is an independent website providing a forum for debate about the future of the Labour movement

You're quite unusual, incredibly unusual in fact, if you're a member of a political party.

Party membership is quite often derided but the number of members a party has is incredibly important. It's a source of donations, a source for organisation, a source of manpower around election times.

There is a really ingrained, long-term lack of trust in politicians and politics. And some of that manifests itself in non-traditional parties doing well.

 

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  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 684.

    How do other countries form Coaltion Governments? Hasn't done Germany any harm, and they had variations on Con/Lab/Green/LD, including Con/Lab. Is it that our politicians are too venal?

  • rate this
    -1

    Comment number 683.

    one word UKIP.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 682.

    As far as I can calculate, there is no worthwhile party to vote into office.

    The UK is now split into so many smaller parties that it would be almost impossible for them to get a majority vote to mandate them overall power.

    The adage is "Divide to conquer and rule".

    Perhaps we have allowed the system to defeat ourselves?

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 681.

    How many more sorries can Cleggy have left in him?

  • rate this
    -1

    Comment number 680.

    675. In this modern day World of super fast broadband and online secure conferencing and websites, why do we even need a 610 MP Parliament costing millions in travel and expenses annually. Local representatives voting and meeting on line can quite easily communicate on line. As for meet and greet with foreign dignitaries, that is what we pay the Royal Family for.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 679.

    Vote - None of the above

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 678.

    674.mahatmacoat

    "I hope there not here to stay, There is no way that I would ever vote for Conservative or Liberal, Now that I have seen there true colours, siding with Terrorists"

    So true. How can this be the same party that opposed the Iraq war?? Lib Dem MPs HAD to resign when Nick Clegg betrayed them by backing the lunatic Cameron on Syria! They've sold themselves for 30 pieces of silver...

  • rate this
    +2

    Comment number 677.

    If coalition is the future so be it. The good news is that Clegg won't be in it as you need to be an MP. The good people of Sheffield Hallam will slaughter him.

  • rate this
    +2

    Comment number 676.

    At 659, SocialistNetwork wrote:
    I think the Right Wing Media - including the BBC - will be so biased in favour of David Cameron in 2015 . . . . .

    Response:
    Pardon? The BBC is right-wing??? Presumably, your abbreviation 'BBC' is NOT the British Broadcasting Corporation, so I wonder to whom you're referring?

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 675.

    Why do we have to retain the political Party System? Why can we not have a collection of MPs, who do not 'belong' to any particular party, but are MPs because each has won election by a majority vote? Then the electorate might feel that their views are being represented. At present, too many MPs toe the Party line because that is the 'safe' thing to do: a guaranteed, cushy, expenses-paid 'job'.

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 674.

    I hope there not here to stay, There is no way that I would ever vote for Conservative or Liberal, Now that I have seen there true colours, siding with Terrorists, Our troops fighting and dying in Afghanistan against Terrorists and Cameron wants to fight side by side the same terrorists in Syria how sick and deranged is that, if the war on fighting Al-Qaeda is over then come out and say so, OK

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 673.

    The old school Liberals such as Simon Hughes have been pushed to one side by the Orange Bookers, so we're dealing with a different party.

    For example, Nick Clegg's intention to bomb Syria back to the Stone Age can't be reconciled with Charlie Kennedy's opposition to Iraq.

    Simon Hughes had his chance to bring down Clegg and now his party faces annihilation. Good riddance to bad rubbish.

  • rate this
    -1

    Comment number 672.

    I suspect that Clegg was a Eton toryboy plant anyway!

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 671.

    The liberal Democrats are pushing themselves forward as a party of coalition. This makes no sense as it is impossible to vote for a coalition, anyone who feels that the current Conservative lead coalition government is doing a good job will vote Conservative and anyone who hates the current Conservative coalition government will vote Labour.

  • rate this
    +3

    Comment number 670.

    Those who voted for the LibDems were:

    A bunch of selfish students who placed their self interest above all else & were duped.

    Natural Labour voters who wanted to reward Clegg for his anti war stance over Iraq but instead let in the Torries.

    Slightly odd aging crumb covered tweed wearing university lecturers

    Next time LibDems are toast.

  • rate this
    +3

    Comment number 669.

    What is the point of launching a Liberal Democrat manifesto when large portions of it will be negotiated away in any future Coalition agreement (should they actually get enough votes to form a coalition with anyone?)

  • rate this
    +2

    Comment number 668.

    "Put us back in government in 2015, Nick Clegg says"

    I love the fact the BBC left this one open for comments for a little over 30 mins!

    Sorry BBC, but your liberals are getting a beating in 2015.

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 667.

    Alas Nick has a safe seat so He will be back post 2015.
    But what about his party? Any student or prospective student should circulate the I'm sorry Video http://youtu.be/KUDjRZ30SNo
    The claim to create another 1M jobs, will they be of the likes of over 75% of the claimed 1.4M paying less than £7.95 hour? Graduates with £40k+ debt take note

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 666.

    What we are saying in this country now is dont study hard and get a decent paying job or set up a business and become successful because the country will tax you to death! Do not become successful as the taxman will take nearly half your salary in tax.

    We need a govt that will make people want to get highly skilled highly paid jobs. Labour ideas seem to be a race to the bottom.

  • rate this
    +2

    Comment number 665.

    All parliamentarians should travel to work on bicycles to set the nation an example.

    Traffic must be entirely banned from Westminster and the City, and Whitehall, Cheapside & Parliament Square must be dug up & turned into wild flower lawns, inter spaced with fountains, according to the Boris Johnson plan.

    This will civilise up London turning the capital into a pleasant garden city

 

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    12:00: Lib Dems kill off Saatchi Bill The Daily Telegraph
    Lord Saatchi

    The Telegraph is reporting that Liberal Democrats have killed off a new law to allow doctors to test new drugs on seriously ill patients without the fear of being sued, despite it passing through the House of Lords. The Medical Innovation Bill, promoted by Lord Saatchi after his wife Josephine Hart died from ovarian cancer, would have allowed doctors to test cutting edge new treatments on patients to help find cures for cancer and other serious illnesses. But Norman Lamb, a Liberal Democrat health minister, has told Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt that his party will not support the bill, effectively vetoing the proposals.

     
  38.  
    @andymcsmith Andy McSmith, writer for The Independent

    tweets: "You said you were as fit as a flea: in my experience, fleas aren't very fit" @afneil tells Nigel Farage. What experience, I wonder?

     
  39.  
    11:41: Carswell: I don't want to lead UKIP Sky News
    Douglas carswell

    UKIP MP Douglas Carswell - speaking on Sky News - has emphatically ruled our running for the leadership of the party. He was asked if he would stand to take over if he won his seat at the election but Nigel Farage lost in South Thanet. Mr Carswell said: "I will never, ever lead a political party. It would be bad for me and bad for the party." During the same interview he affirmed that "UKIP is absolutely not a racist party" despite a recent poll which found about 44% of the electorate regard UKIP as a racist party.

     
  40.  
    11:40: Fox: maintain NATO spending target Sunday Politics
    Liam Fox

    Former Conservative Defence Secretary Liam Fox says the UK should commit to maintaining a defence budget of a minimum 2% of GDP - the NATO benchmark. He adds that a lot of Conservatives would find it difficult to swallow falling short of this target at a time when the 0.7% of GDP foreign aid budget has been ring-fenced. He says the UK reputation as a military ally to the U.S. "took a knock" when parliament in 2013 refused to authorise military action in Syria after the use of chemical weapons there. Not following through on promises "only gives comfort to your enemies" he adds.

     
  41.  
    11:32: Farage on immigration Sunday Politics

    Nigel Farage says that "prior to 2004, UKIP as a political party didn't even talk about immigration as an issue", because the net migration into the UK was only approximately 30,000. He says the "big, big moment" causing immigration problems was the opening of British borders to citizens of ten former Communist countries - as they joined the EU - in 2004.

     
  42.  
    11:29: UKIP 'gay-friendly'? Sunday Politics
    Nigel Farage

    Asked why the head of UKIP's LGBT group - who accused the UKIP leadership of not setting a "gay-friendly" tone - has resigned, Nigel Farage says people in a voluntary organisation are free to leave whenever they wish. He points out that his party does have that LGBT group, has selected two gay parliamentary candidates, and gave a rapturous reception to Kellie Maloney, who spoke about transgender issues at the UKIP spring conference yesterday. He concludes: "Repeated attempts to paint UKIP as homophobic come to nothing."

    He agrees that UKIP don't set a gay-friendly agenda, but points out it also doesn't set a "male-friendly agenda or a female-friendly agenda". He adds: "The most important thing is we all live together equally under the law."

     
  43.  
    11:24: Farage on Russian threat Sunday Politics

    Nigel Farage is now speaking to Andrew Neil down the. He says that if Russia were to invade one of the Baltic states, he would "of course" support a robust Nato response.

     
  44.  
    11:19: Current system 'going bust' Sunday Politics

    Liam Byrne tells Andrew Neil that Labour need to get the policy right as "the current system is going bust", and will add £281bn to the national debt by 2030. Tripling fees meant that three quarters of students will never pay off their debts, and "we can't afford that", he says. Labour's plan intends to fully fund the higher education system by "asking the wealthiest in Britain to fund more." He claims "the challenge is now on the Tories to rule out raising tuition fees up to £15,000" in order to fill the funding gap.

     
  45.  
    11:14: Tuition cut "fully costed" Sunday Politics
    Liam Byrne

    Shadow Universities Minister Liam Byrne tells Andrew Neil he is an "evangelist" for the Labour policy - announced this week - that the party would reduce tuition fees by a third. He says in the long-term he does believe a graduate tax is the right thing to do, but that the party currently can't commit to ensuring a graduate tax would work, as opposed to the "fully costed" policy they've decided to pursue.

     
  46.  
    11:05: Nigel Farage on Sunday Politics Sunday Politics

    Lots to come in the next hour on the Sunday Politics, with UKIP leader Nigel Farage talking to Andrew Neil following UKIP's spring conference in the past couple of days. Also on the programme, interviews with Conservative former defence secretary Liam Fox, and shadow universities minister Liam Byrne. Watch the programme now live on BBC One, or in the Live Coverage tab at the top of this page.

     
  47.  
    11:05: Sin-bin plans 'overkill' BBC Radio 5 live

    William Dartmouth describes Labour's plans to introduce a "sin-bin" system, allowing the Commons speaker to send out misbehaving MPs for an hour for the first warning, or for three sessions if they are a repeat offender, as "an absolutely rotten idea." Transport Minister Stephen Hammond agrees "it's overkill". He complains that the public are judging the politicians by Prime Minister's Questions, "where passions run high."

     
  48.  
    11:03: Commons 'sin-bin' BBC Radio 5 live

    The panel of politicians with John Pienaar are discussing a new Labour proposal to introduce a "sin-bin" system for MPs who get a little too excited at Prime Minister's Questions. Although the proposal is not yet entirely fleshed out, all politicians agree they have a soft spot for the one time of the week when there can be the liveliest back-and-forth between government and opposition - and the highest public viewing figures for the House of Commons.

     
  49.  
    10:58: Pienaar's panel BBC Radio 5 live
    Pienaar's pannel

    Click the tab at the top of the page to listen in to BBC Radio 5 Live as a panel of politicians, including shadow foreign affairs minister Gareth Thomas, UKIP's William Dartmouth, Liberal Democrat Treasury Minister Lord Newby and Transport Minister Stephen Hammond debate the day's political hot topics on Pienaar's Politics.

     
  50.  
    10:53: 'Biggest attack on British values' BBC Radio 5 live

    William Legge, a UKIP MEP and the 10th Earl of Dartmouth, tells John Pienaar it is "absolutely risible" to hear Lib Dem Energy Secretary Ed Davey talking about British values since it was the coalition government, with Labour's help, who implemented the European Arrest Warrant - which he describes as the "biggest attack on British Values."

     
  51.  
    10:52: Shapps: 'Err on the side of caution' BBC Radio 5 live

    Grant Shapps denies that the disagreement between Conservatives and Lib Dems over so-called hate preachers on university campuses constitutes a coalition "row", saying that "if I had a pound for every time people told me there was a coalition row, not only would I be very wealthy but this coalition would have ended years ago". But he admits there is some difference of opinion, and says the Conservatives want to "err on the side of caution" and draw the line of acceptable speech closer to "protecting the security of the British public".

     
  52.  
    10:48: Shapps on MPs' second jobs BBC Radio 5 live
    Jack Straw and Malcolm Rifkind

    Grant Shapps says he has no problem with MPs holding second jobs as long as it is "completely transparent". He says the way to avoid controversy is to "publish what you're doing, have full transparency and disclosure", and he adds that he doesn't want the House of Commons stuffed with 650 professional politicians "who have never done anything else in their life".

     
  53.  
    @alstewitn Alastair Stewart, ITV News Anchor

    tweets: I was reading about @grantshapps on @SkyNews then he pounds out of my speakers on @bbc5live @JPonpolitics Sunday politics conveyor belt.

     
  54.  
    10:42: Shapps's praise for Lib Dems BBC Radio 5 live

    Conservative Party chairman Grant Shapps tells John Pienaar he'll start with some nice words about the Lib Dems, praising Nick Clegg's party by saying they "haven't wavered on their desire to see the deficit got under control", even though it would have been "easy to do so".

     
  55.  
    10:34: 'Juvenile' attitude to coalition BBC Radio 5 live

    The Times columnist Jenni Russell says MPs and the media have been "absolutely juvenile about this whole coalition business", and have chosen to criticise Nick Clegg's party "as if they had freedom of action in government". She says the Lib Dems were "hopelessly naive about the political process when they went into government", but adds that if the British people don't vote in a majority government, voters cannot complain when politicians negotiate and compromise after the election. Ed Davey, unsurprisingly, agrees.

     
  56.  
    10:34: Cable blocking 'hate preacher' plans Sky News

    Grant Shapps accuses Liberal Democrat Business Secretary Vince Cable of blocking Conservative moves to crack down on "hate preachers" in universities. "There is a difference of opinion", he tells Murnaghan: "Cable doesn't want to do what the Conservatives want to do."

     
  57.  
    10:29: '75% of manifesto' passed BBC Radio 5 live
    Ed DAvey Ed Davey gets an early morning cup of tea in the Radio 5 Live studio.

    Ed Davey - referencing the trebling of tuition fees earlier in this government - says it is "easy to pick that one out" to criticise the Lib Dems, but he says voters should focus on the "75% of the manifesto commitments [from 2010] that we delivered" under the coalition agreement.

     
  58.  
    10:27: Solution to housing problem Sky News
    Grant Shapps

    Conservative Party chairman Grant Shapps is now on Murnaghan. He says the solution to Britain's housing problem is pushing people to make brown-field sites available for self-build programmes. He pledges 100,000 new starter homes, which can be purchased at 80% of market value, will be built if the Conservatives get into power. "Government support" and forcing the market "to step up to the plate" will make up the estimated £3.6bn cost of this project, Mr Shapps says.

     
  59.  
    10:26: Tuition fees BBC Radio 5 live

    Ed Davey says the Lib Dems would refuse to sign up to the "stupid" policy of Labour's to reduce tuition fees, in the event of coalition negotiations after the May election. He says it is better to spend £2bn on something other than benefiting the "richer graduates" of universities.

     
  60.  
    10:21: MI5 role in jihadi John radicalisation 'nonsense' Sky News

    Over on Sky's Murnaghan programme, Dr Afzal Ashraf, a consultant fellow at the defence and international affairs think-tank the Royal United Services Institute, says it is "complete nonsense" to suggest that MI5 would have driven Mohammed Emwazi to join Islamic State.

     
  61.  
    10:19: Davey on hate preachers BBC Radio 5 live

    Following reports today that there is a row in the coalition between Theresa May and Vince Cable over so-called 'hate preachers' on university campuses, Ed Davey says "the consensus view - which the Tories used to sign up to" is that prosecutions should only occur if a speaker crossed the line into directly inciting violence. He tells John Pienaar "if you change that line, that's a dangerous attack on free speech".

     
  62.  
    10:14: Labour green record 'hopeless' BBC Radio 5 live
    Ed Davey

    Ed Davey tells John Pienaar that the Labour Party has a "fairly hopeless record" on green issues. The Lib Dems, Mr Davey says, "want the next parliament to be the greenest government ever", and to that end his party will be setting out five green bills in their manifesto.

     
  63.  
    10:10: Tuition fees BBC Radio 5 live

    The Times columnist Jenni Russell tells John Pienaar she can't understand why Labour have chosen to promise to reduce university tuition fees, which she describes as "a very strange way to spend a couple of billion pounds" given that - according to her - the issue isn't a live political hot potato any more.

     
  64.  
    10:03: 'Different types of immigration' The Andrew Marr Show

    While criticising the government's "failed" immigration targets, Yvette Cooper admits that immigration is too high. Refusing to be drawn on specifics, she says that Labour's immigration policy would "target different types of immigration." The government has taken "the wrong approach" by lumping "all migrants" into same migration target, she argues.

     
  65.  
    10:02: Surveillance powers The Andrew Marr Show

    Yvette Cooper says that intelligence agencies already have strong legal powers to implement surveillance on terror suspects. While Labour support updating surveillance powers for new technologies, she says these must have "proper checks and balances." That is why Labour have asked for the independent reviewer of terrorism legislation, David Anderson QC, to review the law and recommend changes.

     
  66.  
    @JPonpolitics John Pienaar, 5 Live presenter

    tweets: On Pienaar's Politics from 10am, I'll be joined by the Energy Secretary, @EdwardDaveyMP and @grantshapps. Watch: http://www.bbc.co.uk/5live

     
  67.  
    09:56: Security services' 'hands tied' The Andrew Marr Show
    Yvette Cooper

    Yvette Cooper says Labour will bring back "the relocation part of control orders" to help "disrupt" terror plots in the UK, by moving suspects "away from their networks, away from the radicalisation, the extremist networks they might have been working with". The security services have had their "hands tied" by the current government, she says, pointing out that despite the "considerable risk" of a terror attack only one person is on a TPIM. This demonstrates that control powers are "simply not strong enough". But she adds that such powers - even if altered in the direction Labour wants - "should not be routinely used".

     
  68.  
    09:50: 'Shocking but not surprising' The Andrew Marr Show
    Kalsoom Bashir

    Kalsoom Bashir, co-director of Inspire, says it is "shocking but not surprising" that young girls are being attracted to join Islamic State, as the group have a "campaign specifically targeting young women" by "hooking into their vulnerabilities." School girls - such as Shamima Begum, Amira Abase and Kadiza Sultana who are believed to be travelling to join Islamic State in Syria - are too "religiously illiterate" to know the difference between "Islam and Islamism" or "facts and lies".

     
  69.  
    09:37: 'Galvanising' extremism The Andrew Marr Show
    Helen Ball

    The UK senior national co-ordinator of counter-terrorism, Deputy Assistant Commisioner Helen Ball, says the Syrian civil war has had a "galvanising" effect on people becoming radicalised. Counter-terrorism investigations have "increased enormously" since the conflict began, while the police service are uncovering "more plots all the time". She adds the police miss the power of the "control order" - which kept terrorism suspects in their homes without access to phones or internet. She adds that it would take an "enormous number" of officers to provide surveillance on a suspect for 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

     
  70.  
    09:30: Immigration 'dismay' The Andrew Marr Show

    Cardinal Nichols says he is "dismayed" that immigration has become such a big issue in politics ahead of the upcoming general election, and says all parties should have their views on immigration "tested." He adds that "the human person" must be always kept foremost in mind when discussing the issue, and he says without the "positive contribution" made by the "vast majority" of immigrants, London would "grind to a halt".

     
  71.  
    @michaelsavage Michael Savage, Times chief political correspondent

    tweets: Key ? on Labour's tuition fees - is there better way to spend £3bn? Tories/Lib Dems could now use same pensions raid to fund something else.

     
  72.  
    09:29: Politics 'everyone's business' The Andrew Marr Show
    Vincent Nichols

    Cardinal Vincent Nichols, Archbishop of Westminster, defends religious institutions getting involved in politics. He tells Sophie Raworth politics is "about the wellbeing of our country and that's everyone's business." He adds: "It urges people to ask what society we want to be and what role we see for ourselves in the wider world."

     
  73.  
    @patrickwintour Patrick Wintour, political editor of The Guardian

    tweets: Labour's tuition fees cut gets pasting in Sundays, but supported 3 to 1 in YouGov poll, despite voters knowing does not aid poor students.

     
  74.  
    09:21: Full surveillance 'not possible' The Andrew Marr Show
    Margot James

    On the subject of British citizens travelling to fight for terrorist movements, Conservative MP Margot James says it is unfortunately "simply not possible to subject all potential targets to the degree of surveillance that we would need in order to prevent them travelling to Syria" or other jihadist hotspots.

     
  75.  
    09:20: Paper review Daily Express

    The Sunday Express reveals how security forces finally identified Emwazi, who has appeared in several videos showing beheadings carried out by the Islamist group. The paper says spies worked out who he was after he used his student number to download discounted software after arriving in Syria. It also carries an interview with UKIP leader Nigel Farage , who calls for security services to be "given tools" to fight extremism.

     
  76.  
    09:13: Paper review The Daily Telegraph

    The Sunday Telegraph leads on a revelation that "an al-Qaeda terrorism suspect closely connected to 'Jihadi John' [a.k.a. Mohammed Emwazi] is living in London, having used the Human Rights Act to prevent the Government from deporting him". The paper also reports that two contemporaries of Emwazi's at his former school have since died while fighting alongside terrorists in Somalia and Syria respectively. Education Secretary has ordered an inquiry into the Quintin Kynaston academy in north London as a result.

    Sunday Telegraph front page
     
  77.  
    09:00: Paper review The Guardian

    Mohammed Emwazi had earlier been able to flee Britain despite being a member of a London-based terror cell that had links to the failed 21/7 attacks on the capital in 2005, according to the Observer. Associates of a 12-strong group spent time at a terror camp in Cumbria a year before the bid, the paper says. And it also reports that Labour is on course for an "absolute majority" in the House of Commons, according to a new poll commissioned by the paper.

    The Observer
     
  78.  
    08:57: 'Bizarre' response to minimum funding guarantee
    Stephen Crabb Stephen Crabb said Welsh ministers were being offered 'exactly' what they had asked for

    Welsh Secretary Stephen Crabb has described Welsh ministers' response to a promise on minimum funding as "bizarre". On Friday, the UK government proposed a funding "floor" - guaranteeing a minimum Welsh government income. The Conservatives now want Labour Welsh ministers to call a referendum on devolving part-control of income tax. First Minister Carwyn Jones - a Labour politician - denounced the funding offer as a "vague promise", but Mr Crabb said it was a response to specific Welsh government demands.

     
  79.  
    08:49: Paper review Sunday Times

    Inside the Sunday Times, a group of the paper's reporters looks at the "bewildering transformation" of Mohammed Emwazi from a "socially-inept computer programmer" to infamous murderer. The paper leads on an alleged row in the coalition between the Conservatives and the Lib Dems: "New rules drawn up by Downing Street to force universities to ban all 'extremist' speakers from their campuses are being blocked by Vince Cable, the business secretary." And it also carries a story about a plan by some senior Tories to "Save Dave" in the event the prime minister wins more votes but fewer seats than Ed Miliband's Labour in May.

    Sunday Times front page
     
  80.  
    08:45: Paper review

    The Mail on Sunday leads with further details of the background of British-born Mohammed Emwazi, a.k.a. 'jihadi John'. The paper's security editor describes how as far back as 2010 Emwazi was convinced the security services were tailing him. Looking elsewhere, the paper's Ian Birrell writes about the recently-assassinated Boris Nemtsov, an opponent of Vladimir Putin's in Russia.

    Mail on Sunday front page
     
  81.  
    08:21: BBC One, 11:00 GMT Sunday Politics

    Today's political coverage on the BBC starts, of course, with Andrew Marr - but by no means finishes there. Join Andrew Neil on the Sunday Politics sofa at 11:00 GMT on BBC One, where he'll be joined by: Labour's Liam Byrne, the shadow universities minister; UKIP leader Nigel Farage; the Conservative former Defence Secretary Liam Fox; and the journalists Isabel Oakeshott, Nicholas Watt, and Janan Ganesh.

    Sunday Politics guests
     
  82.  
    08:20: BBC One, 09:00 GMT The Andrew Marr Show
    Yvette Cooper

    It's been a frantic week in the political world, with election fever spreading to more and more people. UKIP kicked off its spring conference; Labour announced it would reduce tuition fees by a third; and new immigration statistics proved embarrassing for the Conservative Party. But it wasn't a week spent entirely slinging mud - the coalition outlined a new devolved settlement for Wales, in a news conference that saw a show of unity and good humour between David Cameron and Nick Clegg. Join Andrew Marr at 09:00 GMT on BBC One to review the past week and look ahead to the next. His guests today include Shadow Home Secretary Yvette Cooper; Cardinal Vincent Nichols, Archbishop of Westminster; and the actress Kristen Scott-Thomas.

     
  83.  
    08:04: Good morning Alex Hunt Politics editor, BBC News Online

    Hello and welcome to a fresh Sunday's political coverage - there are only nine more before the election takes place. Sam Francis and Adam Donald will bring you all the main news and comment from the papers, and all the key moments from the morning's programmes such as The Andrew Marr Show, Pienaar's Politics and Sunday Politics. Don't forget you can get in touch by emailing politics@bbc.co.uk or via social media @bbcpolitics

     

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