Political party income in 2012

The most recent accounts submitted to the Electoral Commission show that of the three main parties, Labour generated the most income, with £33 million received in 2012.

The chart and table below show where the parties got their money from last year.

Graphic: Top three sources of income by party,2012

Party finances 2012

Conservative Labour Lib Dem

Breakdown according to how the parties themselves identify specific areas of income.

Affiliations (Unions)

7,965,000

Affinity income

29,599

Commercial activity

621,000

3,373,000

Conferences

4,279,000

1,463,792

Donations

14,607,000

5,162,000

1,494,274

Fundraising

456,000

649,000

Grants

322,000

6,656,000

817,787

Interest

62,000

Investment

49,000

66

Legacies

99,000

119,000

Membership

747,000

5,508,000

890,251

Newspaper income

99,397

Notional income

779,000

780,000

213,466

Recharges to party bodies

769,449

Other

2,289,000

2,750,000

245,462

Total

£24,248,000

£33,024,000

£6,023,543

Notes:

  • Affinity income: Money received from joint commercial ventures, such as sponsored credit cards.
  • Government grants: 'Short money', given to the opposition, and policy development grants available to all political parties.
  • Notional income: Value of goods and services, ie. seconded staff
  • Recharges to public bodies: Income received by Lib Dems from the branches of the party in England, Scotland and Wales.

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