Ed Miliband to pledge crackdown on zero-hour contracts

Ed Miliband: "It's true they've been around for years, but it's getting far worse for many people"

Related Stories

Labour leader Ed Miliband is expected to put forward plans to outlaw the exploitative use of zero-hour contracts in his TUC speech.

Hundreds of thousands of workers are on the contracts which allow employers to hire staff with no guarantee of work.

Mr Miliband will tell the union organisation the contracts have been "terribly misused" in some cases.

He will say he would ban employers from insisting that workers be available when there is no guarantee of work.

The government has previously said it will decide this month whether to hold a formal consultation on possible changes to employment laws covering the contracts.

'No security'

Under Labour's proposals, zero-hour contracts requiring people to work exclusively for one business without the guarantee of adequate hours in return would be outlawed.

And there would be action taken to prevent them being used for people working regular hours over a sustained period.

Start Quote

We need flexibility. But we must stop flexibility being used as the excuse for exploitation”

End Quote Ed Miliband

In his address, Mr Miliband will acknowledge that more flexible working has been one of the keys of keeping people in work despite the recession.

"We need flexibility. But we must stop flexibility being used as the excuse for exploitation," he will say.

"Exploitation which leaves workers carrying all of the burdens of unpredictable hours, irregular pay, no security for the future.

"And nowhere is that more true than when it comes to zero-hour contracts."

He will add that in some situations they are "useful", such as for doctors, supply teachers or young people who work in bars.

"But you and I know that zero hours contracts have been terribly misused. This kind of exploitation has to stop," he will say.

"We will support those businesses and workers that want to get on in life. But we will ban practices which lead to people being ground down."

'Confident and secure'

He will say that to a "recovery that works for all" will only come about when "working people feel confident and secure at work".

The Labour leader has asked Norman Pickavance, former director of human resources at supermarket Morrisons, to consult with businesses on how the changes could be implemented and whether the law would need to be changed to enforce them.

Labour had held a summit to discuss options for clamping down on zero-hour contracts last month.

Meanwhile, according to a survey of 5,000 Unite members, as many as 5.5 million people could be on the controversial arrangements.

The union said its research showed there was a "growing sub class" of insecure, low paid employees earning an average of £500 a month.

More on This Story

Related Stories

The BBC is not responsible for the content of external Internet sites

More Politics stories

RSS

Politics Live

  1.  
    11:33: Birmingham schools statement House of Commons Parliament
    Tristram Hunt in the Commons

    Shadow education secretary Tristram Hunt says the government "did nothing" in response to warnings emerging from Birmingham before the 'Trojan Horse' story hit the newspapers. Hunt says there is a broader problem for which the coalition is ultimately to blame. "We do hold this government to account for a chaotic and disjointed schools policy which has increased the threat to child safety and attainment. And sadly, the government's response to this has fallen short."

     
  2.  
    PoliticsHome

    tweets: .@NickyMorgan01 says "every school shld be promoting British values, not just as bulwark against extremism but b/c it is right thing to do"

     
  3.  
    Guardian politics
    man shouting

    tweets: Clegg: next Cameron will ask the 'tea lady' to join debates bit.ly/1twXvqS

     
  4.  
    11:23: Birmingham school statement House of Commons Parliament

    Education Secretary Nicky Morgan says she has told Labour-run Birmingham council officials that "reform is too slow" - and threatens to use emergency powers allowing her to intervene if they do not make changes quickly.

     
  5.  
    11:21: Birmingham schools statement House of Commons Parliament
    Nicky Morgan

    Nicky Morgan says progress has been made since concerns about extremism in Birmingham schools emerged. The schools in question are being incorporated into broader networks in Birmingham and teachers are being investigated, the education secretary says. "We have acted swiftly," she adds.

     
  6.  
    11:17: Birmingham schools statement House of Commons Parliament

    Education Secretary Nicky Morgan is on her feet in the Commons, making a statement on Birmingham schools and the so-called Trojan Horse plot. She starts by pledging to address all the concerns which have been raised.

     
  7.  
    11:14: NHS boost 'mainly down to Labour supporters' BBC News Channel
    The Kings Fund's John Appleby

    New figures suggesting satisfaction with the NHS is at a near record high are unlikely to be the result of recent, direct experience of the service. That's according to the Kings Fund Health think-tank. The Fund's John Appleby told the BBC News Channel that the NHS rating among Labour voters was up 11%, while it was flat among Conservative supporters. Professor Appleby thought that suggested it was a vote of "solidarity" and support for the concept of the NHS.

     
  8.  
    11:11: 'Extremism' in Birmingham schools

    In the next few minutes Education Secretary Nicky Morgan will give an update on dealing with alleged extremism in Birmingham schools. Yesterday, Ofsted's chief inspector, Sir Michael Wilshaw, warned that radicals "have gone to ground" but would return in Birmingham schools unless there was extra funding to recruit better teachers.

    In June, Ofsted issued a damning verdict on the running of a number of Birmingham's schools, placing five into special measures. And this month, the Department for Education issued its own review, one of a series of investigations prompted by the so-called "Trojan Horse letter" - now widely believed to be a hoax.

    The anonymous letter, sent to the local council, referred to an alleged plot by hard-line Muslims to seize control of school governing boards in the city.

     
  9.  
    11:08: League tables explained
    girl reading

    The number of state secondary schools in England considered to be underperforming has more than doubled in a year, according to official figures. Wondering what the figures mean? The BBC News website looks at what school performance data is and what it really means.

     
  10.  
    11:08: Angela Eagle v William Hague House of Commons Parliament
    William Hague in the Commons

    William Hague gets laughs of his own as he responds to Angela Eagle in the Commons. He says Baroness Kramer's watch gaffe wasn't the best gift of the week. That honour goes to Ed Miliband, who received "the gift of being defended by the noble lord Lord Kinnock". Hague says this is a "sure sign of impending disaster", to the mirth of Tory backbenchers. "His belief that Labour is pursuing the right election strategy will be of great comfort to all of us."

     
  11.  
    11:07: Michael Gove's watch House of Commons Parliament
    Michael Gove in Downing Street

    Angela Eagle, who has presumably heard it from reliable sources, recounts an unfortunate incident during Cabinet. She says proceedings were interrupted by Michael Gove's smart watch as it played "one of Beyonce's latest hits". Eagle then turns this into a dig at Gove's absence from the Commons chamber. She gets a big laugh as she wraps up by saying dryly: "Any watch which is smart enough to play Beyonce can surely tell him when business questions is."

     
  12.  
    11:05: Angela Eagle v William Hague House of Commons Parliament
    Angela Eagle in the Commons

    A recap of business questions in the Commons. It began with shadow leader of the House Angela Eagle reviewing the week:

    • On plain packaging, she suggests the government's last-gasp U-turn to support the measure occurred because ministers realised the Conservatives' election adviser and lobbyist "Lynton Crosby wasn't looking"
    • On the NHS, Eagle highlights "overstretched hospitals" and says "the Tories' pledge to protect the NHS is now in tatters".
    • On the Lib Dems, Eagle highlights Baroness Kramer's unfortunate gaffe while on a visit to Taipei. "She gave the city's mayor a watch, which is taboo in local culture because it suggests the recipient's time is running out. She should have given it to her party leader."
     
  13.  
    @BBCNormanS Norman Smith, BBC News Assistant Political Editor

    tweets: Ed Miliband says case for Mansion Tax getting "stronger and stronger"

     
  14.  
    11:04: Voter registration
    Voting in the 2010 general election

    Labour has already claimed changes to the way voters get their names on the electoral roll mean a million fewer people are registered for the general election. Now the leader of the party's Local Government Association group has urged parliament to intervene. Cllr Jim McMahon told local government paper the MJ that councils had "been asked to do the impossible by the [Electoral] Commission". And he warned: "Whilst the current political focus is on the level of voter registration amongst students for the General Election in May 2015, the real democratic crisis will come in December 2015 when potentially millions of voters will be removed from the electoral register."

     
  15.  
    11:02: Broadcasters on the TV debates

    The BBC's Director General Tony Hall says: "We would not be fulfilling our obligations of impartiality to the voters of Northern Ireland if we were to invite one of the Northern Ireland parties but not all the others, which also have substantial support in Northern Ireland."

    Both the BBC and UTV plan dedicated debates in Northern Ireland involving all the larger parties there. The broadcasters are also reiterating that the debates will go ahead even if any of the leaders refuse to participate.

     
  16.  
    11:00: Breaking News: TV debates

    The BBC, Sky and ITN confirm they will not be inviting Northern Ireland's DUP Party to take part in the main televised debates ahead of the general election. The broadcasters are proposing three debates - one between David Cameron and Ed Miliband, and two adding Liberal Democrat leader Nick Clegg, UKIP, the Green Party, the SNP and Plaid Cymru. The DUP had demanded to be included, but in a joint statement the broadcasters say allowing only one of the Northern Ireland parties to take part "would be unfair and discriminatory".

     
  17.  
    10:59: Clegg's 'Monster Raving Loony' jibe
    Natalie Bennett, Nigel Farage, Nick Clegg, David Cameron, Ed Miliband, Nicola Sturgeon, Leanne Wood

    On his LBC phone-in earlier, Nick Clegg was less than complimentary about the way his coalition partner David Cameron is approaching the proposed TV debates. Referring to the PM's calls for the Green Party, then the DUP, to be included, Mr Clegg said: "I suspect next week he will be worried about the fate of the Monster Raving Loony Party." Here's the full story of his comments.

     
  18.  
    10:43: Fracking fallout House of Commons Parliament

    Labour is going on the offensive on fracking in the Commons, as Angela Eagle criticises the government for not being open enough about its shale gas policy. Environment secretary Liz Truss holds the line: "Fracking has a huge potential to provide jobs and growth and also lower our energy costs, and that is why it's so important that we proceed with this vital technology," she says. The exchanges follow Lib Dem Tessa Munt's resignation over the issue earlier this week.

     
  19.  
    10:26: Election battlegrounds
    election map

    We may not know who will win the next general election but we do know which parts of the country will determine the fates of the political parties. The killing grounds in any general election can be found among that minority of parliamentary constituencies - marginal seats - with a history of being won or lost by parties. Here is a guide to the political battlegrounds of the 2015 general election.

     
  20.  
    10:05: Schools' record defended BBC News Channel

    Education Secretary, Nicky Morgan, has defended the government's record on schools. Her comments come as new league tables show a doubling in the number of schools where less than 40% of pupils fail to get five good GCSEs, including maths and English. Speaking on the BBC News Channel, Mrs Morgan said the results reflected changes made to ensure academic standards were as rigorous as possible. More students, she said, were getting the core academic qualifications.

     
  21.  
    10:03: Commons clashes over food poverty House of Commons Parliament

    It's environment, food and rural affairs questions in the Commons, where shadow food minister Huw Irranca-Davies says one million people in Britain are going hungry while relying on food aid. He says the government is taking Britain back to the 1930s in terms of spending and attacks the "staggering complacency" of the coalition. Minister George Eustice, replying, says the government has put 1.7 million people back into work and has taken three million people out of having to pay income tax. He points out Labour's energy policy would have frozen prices which have subsequently fallen.

     
  22.  
    Danny Shaw Home affairs correspondent, BBC News

    tweets: Prison sexual assault data published for first time shows 170 cases in 2013 - highest on record as are violent incidents in yr to Sep 2014

     
  23.  
    09:52: Social capital

    The Office for National Statistics has just released its first ever analysis of 'social capital'. This might sound vague but contains some findings politicians might want to bear in mind as they debate crime, care and charity issues in the election campaign...

    • 65% of people in Britain thought people in their neighbourhood could be trusted
    • 19% of people in the UK reported looking after or giving special help to someone sick, disabled or elderly in 2012/13
    • 19% of people had given unpaid help or worked as a volunteer in a local, national or international organisation or charity in the last 12 months in 2012/13

    The study also found that 49% of people in the UK reported being "very or quite interested in politics" in 2012/13. It's much more interesting in 2014/15, of course.

     
  24.  
    09:43: UKIP defence plans Robin Brant Political Correspondent, BBC News
    Nigel Farage

    The BBC's Robin Brant says UKIP is set to make defence spending a top priority as the party prepares its manifesto. It looks likely that UKIP will be the only Westminster-based party going into the election pledging to spend more on the UK's armed forces. But, as Robin also reveals, there are internal tensions over this issue.

     
  25.  
    09:42: School league tables

    More on the school league table results: This year 330 English secondary schools - up from 154 - failed to get 40% or more of their pupils attaining five good GCSEs, including maths and English. This rise comes after ministers toughened exams and banned re-sits and some vocational qualifications from school performance tables.

    Meanwhile, renowned schools such as Eton, Harrow, Winchester and St Paul's Boys' - among scores of other top private schools - have ended up bottom of the tables.

    Our online story has a map showing school performance in local areas.

    Map
     
  26.  
    09:41: Clegg on PMQs LBC
    David Cameron in PMQs

    Deputy PM Nick Clegg has spent countless PMQs sat next to David Cameron - and has now admitted his expression of concentration is one of boredom, not thoughtful concentration. He jokingly tells LBC presenter Nick Ferrari that he ought to consider finding other ways to amuse himself in the remaining sessions before the election: a book? Yes, Clegg says, adding "Danny Alexander tells me Candy Crush is a great game. I could help with my children's homework."

    The Lib Dem leader - who his advisers are determined to position as an anti-establishment figure despite five years in government - adds, in serious mode: "I think it has descended into the most facile yah-boo kind of politics. The only kind of people who get excited about it are the people in the Westminster village."

     
  27.  
    @PickardJE Jim Pickard

    tweets: Labour aide re Blairite critics: "Get on and help win the election or you can manoeuvre for personal position and caress your own vanity."

     
  28.  
    09:36: Clegg on the TV debates LBC
    Nick Clegg on LBC

    Mr Clegg shrugs off David Cameron's suggestion that the Lib Dems are troublemaking over the TV debates. The blame game, he says, is becoming "ludicrous". He then outlines a carefully-crafted argument about why only those parties which "run things" should feature - and not parties like the SNP and Plaid Cymru. "Just imagine what it's going to be like for the viewing public: by the time everyone's done their one-minute introduction the whole nation will have switched over to Coronation Street."

     
  29.  
    09:32: Breaking News

    Some breaking news now as secondary school performance tables for 2013-14 are published for England. There's controversy over this year's set of data, as the number of secondary schools in England deemed to be underperforming has doubled in a year. It follows confusion over the recognition of the International GCSE qualification.

     
  30.  
    Clegg on Katie Price LBC
    Katie Price

    Nick Clegg is refusing to let the controversy over Katie Price's son undermine his support for the universal nature of support for children with disabilities. Some have suggested the model, rather than the taxpayer, should pay for her son Harvey's treatment. But Clegg doesn't think a case like this changes anything.

    "I would be pretty reluctant to say on the facts of this individual case we therefore throw out the idea of universally treating all children with disabilities with the same kind of compassion and support," he says.

     
  31.  
    @LBC LBC Radio

    tweets: Nick Ferrari asks whether the state should be paying for the transfer of Katie Price's disabled son http://l-bc.co/C1egg #CallClegg

    and

    tweets: Clegg says it's down to the local authority to decide that - even if Katie Price has £30m in the bank http://l-bc.co/C1egg #CallClegg

     
  32.  
    09:24: Tory leadership poll

    In a YouGov poll for the Times (pay wall), London Mayor, Boris Johnson, is edging ahead of five other Tory politicians in a poll on whether they would make a good party leader. YouGov polled 1,655 people on January 27 and 28, with respondents rating the politicians as a "Good leader", "Not a good leader", "Unsure" or "Don't know enough about the person". The other "candidates" are George Osborne, Theresa May, Sajid Javid, Jermey Hunt and Liz Truss.

     
  33.  
    @politicshome PoliticsHome blog

    tweets: .@nick_clegg - "I v much hope nurses would not feel in any way discouraged or intimidated from coming forward" to report NHS failings #LBC

     
  34.  
    The Spectator

    tweets: Europe's crisis is Cameron's opportunity, says @JGForsyth. specc.ie/1yAO3hF

    Spectator cartoon
     
  35.  
    09:02: Murray moments

    A quick look at this Twitter conversation and it's clear some Scottish politicians would much rather watch this morning's Andy Murray match than prepare for Scottish First Minister's Questions.

     
  36.  
    08:56: Benefit fraud plans
    money

    The maximum administrative penalty for benefit fraud that can be offered as an alternative to prosecution could be doubled under government proposals. The House of Commons is going to be asked to approve plans to increase the maximum fine from £2,000 to £5,000. The government says £1.2bn a year is lost to benefit fraud, and that those who commit the crime should "pay a heavy price".

     
  37.  
    08:55: Cost of care BBC Radio 4

    Care minister Norman Lamb is calling on the insurance industry to do more to encourage people to plan ahead for their care needs in old age. His call comes after a BBC investigation found seventeen leading insurance companies currently had no plans to offer suitable policies. Next year, the government will introduce a new £72,000 cap on an individual's care costs and it had been hoped insurance companies would offer policies allowing people to insure themselves for that amount well in advance of any need. Speaking to the Today programme, Mr Lamb said the insurance industry had to "step up to the plate". It had a responsibility, he said, to ensure that the right products were available.

     
  38.  
    House of Commons

    tweets: Commons Chamber sits from 9.30am starting with #Environment, #Food & Rural Affairs Questions. Watch live http://goo.gl/SKhZyE @DefraGovUK

     
  39.  
    08:42: Iraq Inquiry delays
    soldier in Iraq

    Elsewhere on the political agenda, MPs are expected to express their dissatisfaction with the progress of the official inquiry into the Iraq War when they debate the issue in the Commons. The final report from Sir John Chilcot's inquiry, which began its work in 2009, won't be published before May's election. Backbenchers from all parties have been urging officials to explain the delays and give a timetable for publication. Debate is expected to start from around 11:15. Watch proceedings on BBC Democracy Live.

     
  40.  
    08:36: School league tables BBC Radio 4

    Graham Stuart, the Conservative MP who chairs the Education Select Committee, tells the BBC Radio 4 Today programme that the comparison between this year and last year's secondary school league tables are indeed difficult to make - but the changes the government has made to the system are "essential" and will ensure a fairer picture of what is happening in schools. The results for schools in England will be published at 09:30 GMT.

     
  41.  
    Chuka Umunna, Labour business spokesman

    tweets: "Entrepreneurs aren't lone wolves: Labour will back them for the good of all" | my piece in today's @CityAM

     
  42.  
    08:15: Murray moments
    tennis

    Politicians on the campaign trail may struggle to make themselves heard by sports fans this morning as Britain's Andy Murray takes on Tomas Berdych in the men's semi-final of the Australian Open in Melbourne. Follow the match online with live video, radio and text commentary or watch it on BBC Two from 08:20 GMT.

     
  43.  
    @RobbieGibb Robbie Gibb, Daily Politics editor

    tweets: On today's Daily Politics...... #bbcdp

    Screen grab
     
  44.  
    08:01: Clegg hails Growth Fund BBC Breakfast

    Deputy Prime Minister, Nick Clegg, says today's announcement that £2bn worth of public investment will move from central to regional control was all about backing local people and driving local economic growth.

     
  45.  
    07:57: School league tables
    girl at

    As we've reported, hundreds of secondary schools in England, including many top private schools, could see their league table ratings plummet following a shake-up of the system. They're being published at 09:30 GMT. The government says it has stripped out qualifications of little value, but some head teachers say the tables will be "a complete mess" because of the changes.

    Brian Lightman, general secretary of the Association of School and College leaders, says it even "calls into question the validity of the performance tables".

     
  46.  
    Chris Mason Political correspondent, BBC News

    tweets: A "clammy hands" theme to Nick Clegg's interviews. He's told @bbcbreakfast&@gmb about sticky paws of "bureaucrats." http://bit.ly/18xccRz

     
  47.  
    Norman Smith, BBC News Assistant Political Editor

    tweets: Nick Clegg - Never mind the apocolypitc warnings we will confound our critics at the election

     
  48.  
    07:39: Poll tracker
    poll tracker graphic

    The polls will be coming thick and fast in the coming months - keep up to date with the BBC's new interactive poll tracker, which lets you see the results of polls conducted by a range of organisations.

    The tracker also includes a timeline of key events, so you can see how public opinion might have shifted at important junctures in the past five years.

     
  49.  
    07:34: 'Responsible and fair' BBC Breakfast

    Liberal Democrat leader Nick Clegg says the central question of the election campaign is how to finish the job of securing an economic recovery - and doing so fairly. In Bristol, the deputy prime minister tells BBC Breakfast News that Labour wants to "lurch off" to the left and the Conservatives to the right. The Conservatives, he says, want to make cuts for ideological reasons; Labour wants to stick its head in the sand and not deal with the deficit. The Liberal Democrats would cut less than the Conservative and borrow less than Labour.

     
  50.  
    07:26: Scottish Home Rule
    Ed miliband

    A "Home Rule Bill for Scotland" would be introduced within the first 100 days of a Labour government, leader Ed Miliband says. He will make the commitment during a visit to Glasgow later. The Scottish National Party says any suggestion the bill would amount to real Home Rule is "laughable".

     
  51.  
    07:23: Oversight criticised

    The Department for International Development has been criticised by MPs for "unacceptably poor" oversight of a UK-funded development agency. The Public Accounts Committee says the Private Infrastructure Development Group is beset by "poor financial management". It says there are doubts about the integrity of its investments and a closer eye is needed on its spending - including spending of more than £75,000 on 15 flights between January 2011 and July 2014.

     
  52.  
    07:21: League tables row
    schools

    New league tables for English secondary schools are being published today and not everybody will be pleased with what they show. Scores of top private secondaries expect to be at the bottom of the tables, following confusion over International GCSEs. School leaders say many schools have been "caught unawares" by a shift in which qualifications are recognised. Speaking to Radio 4, Russell Hobby, general secretary of the National Association for Head Teachers, says publishing data on schools is the right thing to do - but they need to be used with "extreme caution", particularly this year.

     
  53.  
    Price of power The Daily Telegraph

    Scrap Trident, ditch Barnett, reverse the cuts - the price of power for Miliband and Cameron in a hung parliament http://tgr.ph/1K8DUzv

     
  54.  
    07:16: Clegg in Bristol BBC Breakfast
    Nick Clegg

    Nick Clegg is in Bristol announcing a new round of local investment. "We need to end the Whitehall knows best culture that has held this country back for far too long," he tells the BBC.

    Under the coalition's Growth Deals scheme, around £2bn a year from Whitehall budgets is being gathered into a Local Growth Fund. The money is then being channelled through 39 Local Enterprise Partnerships, run by councils and businesses.

     
  55.  
    07:15: Don't dismiss the Greens Financial Times

    In its leader column, the Financial Times (pay wall) argues for greater scrutiny of Green Party policies. The German Greens, it says, can claim credit for that country's abandonment of nuclear power generation. And, in the UK, the party's growing popularity puts pressure on Labour to move in a green-ward direction.

     
  56.  
    07:04: Women in prison BBC Radio 5 live
    Prison officer locking gates

    The government is expected to announce measures today aimed at trying to stop so many women being sent to prison. Justice Minister Simon Hughes wants to halve the number of women ending up behind bars. He tells BBC Radio 5 live Breakfast female offenders are a "special case" and should be treated differently to men because many had been victims themselves. There are currently around 3,800 women in prison in England and Wales.

     
  57.  
    07:02: Breaking News BBC Breakfast

    Deputy PM Nick Clegg arrives in Bristol to announce latest round of Growth Fund investment, he will be live on BBC Breakfast 07:10. You can watch via the Live Video tab at the top of this page.

     
  58.  
    06:52: Where are the Real Tories? The Guardian

    In the Guardian, Simon Jenkins bemoans what he sees as the absence of "Real Tories" from the election campaign. They, he says, would oppose the advance of the modern state. But, according to the columnist, no Westminster politician "dares oppose the monolithic interest group that is modern government".

     
  59.  
    06:50: NHS survey
    Doctor

    Public satisfaction with the way the NHS runs in England, Wales and Scotland has risen to its second highest level ever, according to survey data for 2014, published by the King's Fund health think tank. The latest results show satisfaction with the NHS rising from 60% to 65% in 2014, while dissatisfaction fell to an all-time low of 15%.

    A couple of caveats though: This is a survey of 1,937 members of the public, not patients specifically, so the findings are more likely to reflect perceptions of the NHS than experience of it; and the polling was carried out before the recent well-publicised winter pressures on the NHS began to bite.

    A BBC/Populus poll this week suggested the NHS was the most important issue ahead of the general election, in May.

     
  60.  
    06:47: Fury The Daily Mail

    A more in-depth look at some of today's papers now.

    Tomorrow's Mail front page

    The Daily Mail says Labour's "big beasts are at war over Ed Miliband's controversial election campaign tactics", after grandee John Prescott "reacted with fury" to interventions by former Labour Health Secretary Alan Milburn and former minister Lord Hutton who aired frustration over the party's "retreat into its supposed 'comfort zone' of the NHS".

     
  61.  
    BBC Radio 4 Today
    BBC

    tweets: Read today's full running order here: bbc.in/1LjBFg6 #r4today

     
  62.  
    06:29: Making the headlines
    Telegraph/Guardian front pages

    Here is a round-up of the main stories covered in the UK's national newspapers this morning - including a look at the front pages and expert reviews on the BBC News Channel.

     
  63.  
    06:24: Back out campaigning

    After all the excitement of Prime Minister's Questions at Westminster yesterday, the party leaders are expected to be back out and about today, as the long election campaign continues.

     
  64.  
    06:20: Good morning Alex Hunt Politics editor, BBC News Online

    Hello and welcome to a fresh day's coverage of political developments ahead of the 7 May General Election - yes there's just 98 days to go now. You'll be able to listen or watch all the BBC's political output today on this page and we'll be bringing you all the best clips, quotes, analysis, reaction and breaking political news throughout the day. If you want to see what to expect, here's yesterday's campaign countdown.

     

Features

Copyright © 2015 BBC. The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.