Seaside towns regeneration fund to be extended

 
Hastings Pier A project to restore Hastings pier was among previous successful bidders for cash

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Seaside towns are being invited to bid for money from a £29m funding pot aimed at boosting deprived areas.

The government says its Coastal Communities Fund is being extended to 2014-15, due to rising marine revenue.

It is backed by revenue from offshore wind farms, tidal power and other marine activity.

Previous bids have included a project to make Wadebridge, Cornwall, Britain's first solar-powered town and a new harbour on Barra, in the Western Isles.

Chief Secretary to the Treasury Danny Alexander said the fund was "giving our seaside towns and villages a real chance to grow as the nation benefits from our marine resources".

He said the fund would help create hundreds of opportunities for local apprentices and support jobs and businesses in the areas.

Earlier this month, the Centre for Social Justice think tank warned that some seaside towns in England and Wales were stuck in a cycle of poverty and suffering "severe social breakdown".

Deprivation

And figures from the Office for National Statistics (ONS) this week suggested 25 out of 31 "larger" English seaside towns had above-average levels of deprivation, including Skegness, Blackpool, Clacton and Hastings.

Blackpool, which attracts more visitors per year than any other UK coastal town, had the highest level of deprivation among the larger English seaside destinations in 2010, the ONS figures suggested.

Health and disability were the biggest areas of deprivation in the seaside towns.

Among the six towns which bucked the trend were Poole and Christchurch in Dorset and Bognor Regis in West Sussex.

The Coastal Communities Fund was set up in 2012 to try to boost deprived seaside towns and villages and will now be extended by a year. The government says the idea is to help coastal towns to create new business opportunities, jobs and skills that will benefit the area.

The money behind it comes from the Crown Estates, which own the rights to fish-farms, wind farms, ports and marinas. Successful bidders are given money equivalent to 50% of revenues generated from things like offshore wind and tidal power and ship moorings in the area.

 

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  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 122.

    @120.treacle_01
    "Not been to the costas then?"

    If Britain and the British didn't exist, do you think they'd be the same? I rest my case.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 121.

    Funny reading some of these comments.

    Yes, we too can have unspoilt seaside towns just like the French. We can have a bridge connecting the IoW to Portsmouth, we can have jobs and security. All it needs is for everyone who's working to pay 50% as much tax again, and we're there.

    It won't fix the tattoos and louts though, we'll need better education for that. OK, let's make that 75% more...

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 120.

    @118.Welsh Dragon
    32 Minutes ago
    No other country in the world has turned a beautiful natural wonder - where land meets sea - into one long parade of amusement arcades, fish & chip shops and tatty rip-off drinking dens.

    ---

    Not been to the costas then?

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 119.

    Hmmmm lets go to Spain, we can go in an authentic Irish bar, get me full english in the morning, read the sun whilst drinking copious amounts of beer fighting the Germans for a sun bed.

    Sound great...

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 118.

    No other country in the world has turned a beautiful natural wonder - where land meets sea - into one long parade of amusement arcades, fish & chip shops and tatty rip-off drinking dens.

    The icing on the cake? Rusting iron piers sticking out into the sea populated with more of the above.

    Way to go Britain.

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 117.

    @110. Some truth in this but what is a real job? Surely anything providing a regular decent income fits the bill. We are, after all, predominantly a service economy. I did a year in London post uni and then borrowed £ to start my own business in a rural area. Ended up employing nearly 200 people. We somehow need to rediscover our national entrepreneurial spirit. Waiting for jobs doesn't work.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 116.

    114. Politicans - No interest in the people

    Oh, you mean the Great British public.

    /////////

    No, I don't. Just a part of the Great British public.

  • rate this
    +2

    Comment number 115.

    London gets cross rail and HS2 while residents of the Isle of Wight for example cant even get of their island without it costing a fortune and government doesnt even lift a finger. Is it any surprise that places like this and other resorts feel left out and end up run down with high unemployment and no prospects for their youth.

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 114.

    111.Dun Geonson

    Oh, you mean the Great British public.

    Yes, they are all tattooed, beer swilling, aggressive louts with big families and even bigger dogs.

    Its always been that way.

    Try taking your nose away from the fantasy world TV screen and looking around the real world for a while.

    You'll be stunned at how "great" Britain isn't.

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 113.

    I cycle to work through Blackpool every day, and it's a pleasure. The Fylde coast is a pretty good place to live for those with a job, but we're too dependent on the public sector. The town's deprivation is concentrated in a central zone of bedsits and hmo's; outside that area it's fine, and regular visitors know it. I can think of plenty of far worse places to live.

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 112.

    #108
    Your observation is correct

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 111.

    Whenever I go to a sea resort, invariably it seems invaded by tattooed, beer cans swilling aggressive louts and their families and pets. Is this where the money is going?

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 110.

    Again this is all about centralised industry & commerce.

    Few people in these rural, coastal areas want to work in the hospitality & tourist industries.

    They need REAL jobs with REAL pay and REAL prospects for REAL futures.

    But the city-centric and, more specifically, the London-centric ethos of the UK is ruining their lives.

    How it can be solved is anyone's guess.

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 109.

    I drove westward along the French coast from Calais last month and through a line of costal towns. Most were more prosperous & characterful than their UK counterparts. Really rather unspoilt. More significant is they don't rely just on the holiday trade. They are integrated with their hinterland and people have employment in food & drink production, animal feeds and rural artisan industries.

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 108.

    Many of the posts on this HYS seem to be under the misapprehension that funds are being made available to ailing seaside towns to revitalise the holiday industry.

    This is simply not the case. These towns are in desperate need of jobs, housing and infrastructure that the inhabitants badly need and which the inhabitants of most other towns have been enjoying for decades.

  • rate this
    -1

    Comment number 107.

    I'm sorry to say but it's cheaper and nicer to get a cheap flight and hotel abroad in the sunny Med than it is to stay in a resort here.
    I'm still happy to visit the seaside here for the odd-weekend so really these resorts need to change in response to people's change of habits. No point in flogging a dead horse.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 106.

    Not enough love has been shown to our decaying seaside resorts and it is about time this government should invest in a once great part of British holiday tradition.
    Most places are ghost towns and if people choose to travel further for a holiday then it will be far too late to turn this sorry situation into something we can be proud of again.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 105.

    There seems to be broad agreement the old seaside towns have had their best days. So what next? Makes sense to consolidate around towns that could still remain viable. Gov could aid such people movement as a longer term policy. For the past 5,000 years communities have grown whereas some failed & were abandoned. Facilitating this may be cost effective and ultimately kinder.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 104.

    An interesting piece, and a cogent analysis of the reasons why citizens of many coastal towns have watched them descend into bleakly depressing and often frightening places to live.

    A key principle of the welfare state is to force taxpayers to fund housing for those who cannot, or will not, pay for their own. It's perhaps inevitable that the least-cost option is to dump them in coastal towns.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 103.

    If the money helps develops a mixed economy something more sustainable that tourism then that's fine. Some towns were there purely for tourism whereas others have more historical significance which can be developed. Anyway send Portas she'll sort them out she's even brought down the rate of unemployment by one.

 

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