UK Politics

Ed Balls fined for going through red traffic light

Ed Balls
Ed Balls has been fined for traffic offences on previous occasions

Shadow chancellor Ed Balls has been fined for going through a red light in his car after leaving Parliament.

A spokesman for the Morley and Outwood Labour MP confirmed reports in the Sun of the incident in December last year.

Mr Balls was driving on the Embankment, in central London, after a late-night Commons sitting when he was caught on camera passing through the light.

The news comes two months after Mr Balls confessed to having been caught speeding in a separate incident.

A spokesman for Mr Balls said the traffic light offence had happened as the MP was driving home six months ago.

"He passed through the light just after it turned red and he was photographed on a traffic camera," the spokesman added.

"At the time, the Blackfriars underpass ahead of the traffic light was closed and all traffic passing through the light was being diverted up a slip-road."

The Sun reported that the shadow chancellor was fined £350 and had three points put on his licence after pleading guilty at City Magistrates' Court on Wednesday.

Speeding course

In April, Mr Balls said he had been caught speeding while driving at 56mph in a 50mph zone on a motorway in his West Yorkshire constituency.

Writing on his blog, he said he had paid a fine and attended a speed awareness course rather than accept penalty points.

"I currently have no points on my licence and would like to keep it that way," he wrote.

Mr Balls was also caught by the police using his mobile phone while driving during the last general election campaign.

He was fined £60 and given three penalty points in April 2010 after being caught during a late-night drive between Yorkshire and London. However, a spokesman said that the points were never applied.

Mr Balls apologised at the time for the incident and said it had been "a fair cop".

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