What to do about Qatada?

 

He's out...again.

Not as promised on a plane to Jordan but, this morning, in a car taking him back home here in Britain.

It wasn't meant to be like this.

Seven months ago the home secretary said: "We can soon put Qatada on a plane and get him out of our country for good."

The opposition have mocked Theresa May in public but in private they understand the problem.

After all the British government - first Labour, now the Coalition - have been fighting Abu Qatada's lawyers in the courts for 11 years at a cost, some claim, of more than a million pounds.

In theory ministers now have three options.

To charge Abu Qatada under British law - BUT so far there is simply not the evidence to do so.

To appeal against this week's ruling - they'll try but success is, as they surely know by now, far from guaranteed.

That's why the most likely option is that Jordan is lobbied to change its law again - in an effort to reassure the British courts.

The home secretary's officials are in Amman now. The King of Jordan is in London for talks next week.

Cheerleaders for human rights legislation say this proves that it can even change laws in the middle east.

Critics say that's at a high cost to people here in Britain.

 
Nick Robinson, Political editor Article written by Nick Robinson Nick Robinson Political editor

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  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 247.

    Firstly he isn’t one of our nationals so why should we have to deal with him but until we resolve the legal issue,we should move him to a more remote rural area where they have no internet or mobile phone network or tv in a house that has all the basics and preferable no inhabitants in the surrounding area I think this would forefill our legal requirement and reduce or costs and security issues.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 246.

    Can't the American's tell us what to do like normal?

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 245.

    Thanks for NOT replying to me YESTERDAY Nick ? Given we are selling planes don't you think you should 'get real' and answer my question ?

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 244.

    It's all very well for the trendy libertarians to congratulate themselves on having helped to free Qatada from jail, but people like him have no libertarian views themselves, and are just working the system to their own advantage. If people with similar views to Qatada's eventually prevail in this country, it will be the libertarians who'll suffer most as a result of their erstwhile misguidedness.

  • Comment number 243.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 242.

    I'm sure he's quite nice when you get to know him.

    Say his name with a "have a banana" lilt to it (as they did on HIGNFY) and you'll start to warm to him, I promise.

    Ms May has to respect the law. We are an enlightened nation, that's why people like Abu Q want to live here. You never know, we might convert him.

  • rate this
    -1

    Comment number 241.

    Isn`t May getting on with the appeal...and...starting afresh, in anticipation of Jordan writing " no torture " into their constitution..?

    Yep...it`s frustrating, but we can`t cherry pick laws and how we apply them...whats good for the goose is good for the gander...a principle is at stake....we can`t deport people to regimes that torture people..

    So mabye the Law has had a civilising effect

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 240.

    239. Lessons learned - is almost impossible to deport anyone for anything when the judges are more concerned about their own fat pensions & getting Knighthoods & other favours from the previous HRA preaching, legal aid fees dipping, liberal left, establishment - instead of doing what they're highly paid to do as is to uphold the letter of British law for our safety & security - chances came & went

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 239.

    238:

    The more I read, the more uses it seems various interests might have for this man.

    They'd do well to remember the advice re length of a spoon, I think.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 238.

    236
    I think that your 'understanding' on this is 'behind the curve'

  • Comment number 237.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 236.

    235.nautonier

    "...MI6 have dossier on Qataba that is as 'thick as Gordon Brown' - but it cannot be used for national security reasons..."

    ===

    That might have been claimed.

    However, my understanding is that for technical reasons it is inadmissible in Court in any case.

    I see no reason for normal enquiries not to be made, nor for MI not to assist the police as far as possible.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 235.

    234.Eddy from Waring
    It seems to me the police are sitting on their hands yet again.
    They could follow up claimed MI intelligence of his criminality,
    +
    MI6 have dossier on Qataba that is as 'thick as Gordon Brown' - but it cannot be used for national security reasons. Police are not to blame & are not responsible for the legal process mess as resulting, initially, from bad UK legal decisions

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 234.

    It seems to me the police are sitting on their hands yet again.

    They could follow up claimed MI intelligence of his criminality, and have him serve a substantive sentence if convicted.

    Sitting back like this gets a large part of the public frothing against ECHR, EU, Human Rights Act, and the independence of the Courts.

    No police, or anyone else, would want that, surely?

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 233.

    230.ToryBoy
    No228 Nautonier
    You seem a little more confused than normal.
    +
    Not confused just adding to what some obviously don't know or have'nt thought about - judges have discretion & Qatada could have been deported 10 years ago if the judiciary had followed their oath & pledge to uphold British law - latest set back is a result of more recent EU rulings - Try & get the facts right

  • Comment number 232.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 231.

    Why not withdraw all his benefits and legal aid?

    He can then pay his own lawyers to sue the government and pay all his housing bills himself!

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 230.

    No228 Nautonier
    You seem a little more confused than normal.
    Surely you know the difference between the ECHR and the EU?
    Do you believe in the 'independence of the judiciary'? if not, why?

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 229.

    The decision is a simple one.
    Do you want judges to decide based on the law or do you want politicians to be able to ignore the law if it suits them?
    No-brainer.
    227 Really? You'd be happy for the State to get confessions by torture? Unbelievable!

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 228.

    The Liberal Fascists at the EU say that Abu must stay.
    The feeble judge decising his case is concerned about his human rights (and his /her big fat pension)
    Abu must stay.
    Its not EU law or human rights
    Its Liberal Fascism when Eurocrats exceed their democratic mandate.
    Only way to 'remove this man' is for the UK to leave the EU
    But even the worst criminals deserve competent legal process?

 

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