As it happened: Wednesday at the Labour Party conference 2012

Key Points

  • Shadow health secretary Andy Burnham pledges to repeal the NHS Act and "restore the N in NHS" if Labour is re-elected
  • Shadow home secretary Yvette Cooper has called for police watchdog the IPCC to be replaced with a new Police Standards Authority
  • Following his One Nation Labour speech yesterday, party leader Ed Miliband took questions from delegates
  1.  
    0930:

    Good morning and welcome to our live coverage of Wednesday's action at the Labour Party conference. Following his widely acclaimed speech to conference yesterday afternoon, Labour leader Ed Miliband returns for a Q&A session with delegates at 2.15pm.

     
  2.  
    0931:

    But there's plenty happening before that too, with keynote speeches from shadow justice secretary Sadiq Khan, shadow home secretary Yvette Cooper and the shadow health secretary, Andy Burnham.

     
  3.  
    0935:

    But first, delegates turn their attention to a motion entitled "crime, justice, citizenship and equalities".

     
  4.  
    0940:

    The BBC's Norman Smith tweets about some cosmetic conference changes: Backdrop to Labour Conference set now been rebranded. Gone is Re-building Britian. Hello....One Nation #lab12

     
  5.  
    0941:

    Some brutal honesty from National Executive Committee member Jim Kennedy just now. "I hope you've all had some strong coffee this morning because this is a fairly laborious and boring speech," he told them.

     
  6.  
    0945:

    Also coming up, at 11.05am, is a debate on "rebuilding our NHS".

     
  7.  
    0950:
    One Nation backdrop And here's that new conference backdrop in all its glory.
     
  8.  
    0955:

    The shadow justice secretary, Sadiq Khan, is on his feet addressing delegates. He says Labour's challenge at the next general election is to "spell out" how it will repair the "damage" caused to the country by the coalition.

     
  9.  
    0958:
    Ed Miliband Ed Miliband prepares for a busy day on the TV interview circuit
     
  10.  
    0959:

    From the BBC's Kayte Rath, in Manchester: Those wanting to get a memento of Ed Miliband's big speech were in luck this morning. Labour Students were selling hard copies of the 7,500 word speech for the princely sum of £3. Plenty of people seemed happy to part with their cash for this little bit of history.

     
  11.  
    1001:

    Mr Khan attacks the coalition's record on crime and justice, and criticises the government's "self-serving" and "partisan" changes to parliamentary constituency boundaries.

     
  12.  
    1002:

    Ed Miliband might have gone to the same north London school as X-Factor judge Tulisa Contostavlos but he hasn't been watching her on Saturday night television. He told ITV's daybreak this morning he was "spending too long" working on his speech to watch the latest series. Tulisa is one of Haverstock School's most famous former pupils.

     
  13.  
    1005:

    The shadow justice secretary pledges that a future Labour government would give a justice minister specific responsibility for "rooting out" mental health problems in the criminal justice system. He also promises action to reduce the number of women in prisons.

     
  14.  
    1007:

    From the BBC's Kayte Rath, in Manchester: Last night's Labour Friends of Israel reception was a popular destination for Labour's top team. Ed Miliband got a rapturous welcome as he entered the crowded room. Other shadow cabinet members there were Rachel Reeves, Chuka Umunna, Ivan Lewis, Stephen Twigg and Liam Byrne.

    Labour Friends of Israel
     
  15.  
    1007:

    Labour would extend Freedom of Information laws to cover the delivery of public services by private companies, Sadiq Khan announces to applause. This would include "prisons, schools and health service", he explains.

     
  16.  
    1008:

    It's no "class act", says Ed Miliband about his speech. He's not talking about the quality of his delivery - which has been roundly praised - but dismissing claims he played class politics by talking about his comprehensive education. In an interview this morning the Labour leader says: "It is much more to do with trying to explain who I am."

     
  17.  
    1018:
    Pie in a cup

    From the BBC's Brian Wheeler, in Manchester: Fringe meeting food is sometimes a little weird. Pie-in-a-cup anyone?

     
  18.  
    1018:

    At 12.15pm, leading figures from the Arab Spring will address the Labour conference, including founding member of the Egyptian Social Democratic Party, Dr Hania Sholkamy. They will be introduced by shadow foreign secretary Douglas Alexander.

     
  19.  
    1020:

    Ed Miliband has been going round the TV and radio studios this morning, answering questions about yesterday's speech. The Labour leader has been trying to distinguish "one-nation Labour" from the incarnations that came before.

     
  20.  
    1021:

    Mr Miliband told BBC Five Live: "Old Labour wasn't careful with public money... I think New Labour was too timid about the responsibilities of those at the top... One Nation Labour is about saying we want responsibility from all, including those at the top. We can't shrink from taking on the vested interests like banks and energy companies."

     
  21.  
    1021:
    Delegates at Labour conference Delegates vye to catch the eye of the conference chair for a chance to speak during the crime and justice debate
     
  22.  
    1026:

    The Labour leader was also pushed by the BBC's Evan Davis on Radio 4's Today programme earlier this morning. He refused to make any new spending commitments but said the country needs a "different political approach for new times". You can listen to the interview online.

     
  23.  
    1028:

    A foretaste of the conference NHS debate: shadow health minister Liz Kendall has taken to the BBC News channel to explain Labour's objections to the coalition's reforms to the NHS in England. They set "all the different parts of the system against one another", she argues. Labour would repeal the increasing role of competition law in health service provision, but keep GP commissioning, she says.

     
  24.  
    1030:

    Things are running a little behind schedule in the conference hall. Shadow home secretary Yvette Cooper was due to start speaking at 10.25am. She's seated on the main stage though, so should be on soon.

     
  25.  
    1032:
    Massage tent at Labour conference After the rigours of the conference circuit, one of the most popular stalls is the massage tent where delegates can get head, neck and back massages
     
  26.  
    1036:

    "The Tories have no strategy to cut crime, only to cut police," Labour's deputy chairman Tom Watson says.

     
  27.  
    1039:

    Mr Watson tells amused delegates his party's new "one nation" slogan is an anagram of "no Etonian". Maybe he has missed his leader's attempts to play down the class aspects of yesterday's speech?

     
  28.  
    1047:

    Labour had an "exceptional" record on cutting crime, Tom Watson argues, and was "the first government in history" to prioritise anti-social behaviour. He claims the Conservatives are "cheerleaders for cuts" and are not focused on driving down crime in communities.

     
  29.  
    1052:

    Shadow home secretary Yvette Cooper has begun her speech with a tribute to murdered police officers PC Nicola Hughes and PC Fiona Bone. Delegates stand to applause.

     
  30.  
    1054:

    The shadow home secretary thanks the police for their all their hard work during the London Olympic Games.

     
  31.  
    1057:
    Yvette Cooper Shadow home secretary Yvette Cooper sets out her party's policies on crime and policing
     
  32.  
    1059:

    On the Andrew Mitchell police row, Ms Cooper says of David Cameron: "He chose to back him, not sack him... Once again, it's one rule for cabinet, one rule for the plebs."

     
  33.  
    1100:

    "Plebs of the world unite, we have nothing to lose but this government," Yvette Cooper continues, to applause from delegates.

     
  34.  
    1102:
    Ed Balls Shadow chancellor Ed Balls applauds his wife's clarion call to the "plebs of the world"
     
  35.  
    1103:

    "We want the police to do more to reflect the public - including recruiting more black and minority ethnic officers too," Ms Cooper tells delegates. "We also want stronger action when policing goes wrong," she continues.

     
  36.  
    1104:

    Labour would scrap the Independent Police Complaints Commission, she announces, and replace it with "a new, stronger Police Standards Authority... to raise standards, pursue powerful investigations and ensure there are proper safeguards in place".

     
  37.  
    1107:

    The shadow home secretary accuses David Cameron of "breaking his promise on immigration". But she concedes that the last Labour government "got things wrong" on immigration, which is why the party needs to "listen and learn".

     
  38.  
    1110:

    More criticism of David Cameron. She accuses the prime minister of "weak politics" by "pandering" to Conservative backbenchers for wanting to renegotiate the European Arrest Warrant "just because it has the word Europe in the title".

     
  39.  
    1111:

    The BBC's Ross Hawkins tweets: So far Yvette Cooper has channelled Peel, Marx and Blair...

     
  40.  
    1112:

    The BBC's James Landale adds: Is it just me or is the Labour Party now divided between Disraelians and the Peelites?

     
  41.  
    1112:
    Yvette Cooper Ms Cooper continues a theme of this conference - trying to grab some Olympic spirit by turning to the cameras for her version of Mo Farah's "Mo-bot".
     
  42.  
    1112:

    Ms Cooper also calls for more action on "economic crime", referencing the Libor inter-bank lending rate scandal.

     
  43.  
    1114:

    We should have statutory sex and relationship education in schools, the shadow home secretary urges. "For boys and for girls," she continues, "including zero tolerance of violence in relationships.".

     
  44.  
    1114:

    The Conservatives are no longer the party of law and order, she claims, "Weak on crime, weak on the causes of crime - that is David Cameron's Conservative Party," she intones.

     
  45.  
    1114:

    Labour backbencher Austin Mitchell tweets: Yvette is wrong to praise European warrants. The people she cited could be brought back without it and too many go the other way on trivia

     
  46.  
    1115:

    "Conference, it is the Labour Party that is now the party for policing. Labour the party for law and order," she concludes to applause.

     
  47.  
    1124:

    The BBC's Iain Watson has been told the "one nation" slogan will be added as a "permanent prefix" to Labour - at least until the next election anyway. Ed Miliband referred to "One Nation Labour" in interviews this morning and it looks like the re-brand is here to stay. Will it have the same impact as putting the "new" in New Labour?

     
  48.  
    1125:

    We're now moving on to the debate on "rebuilding the NHS", chaired by the shadow leader of the House of Commons, Angela Eagle. Delegate Patrick Smith claims the NHS is in "critical condition" and under threat from privatisation.

     
  49.  
    1126:

    "Who will save the NHS?" he asks. "If we can answer that question then Labour will win the next election by a landslide," he continues.

     
  50.  
    1127:
    Ed Miliband and Yvette Cooper It's smiles all round as Ed Miliband thanks Yvette Cooper for her speech
     
  51.  
    1133:

    Delegates are watching a short video presentation on the NHS by Labour peer and fertility expert Lord Winston.

     
  52.  
    1134:
    Lord Winston Labour's Lord Winston watches his own presentation on the state of the NHS
     
  53.  
    1135:

    Another dig at Tory chief whip Andrew Mitchell. Yvette Cooper tells BBC News the police have the power to arrest people who swear at them. But it's up to officers to decide who they take action against.

     
  54.  
    1138:

    Lord Winston has taken to the stage to address delegates. He says there were "no grounds whatsoever" for the government's reforms to the NHS in England. He is particularly critical of the Liberal Democrats who "reneged" on promises to make the bill "more palatable".

     
  55.  
    1144:

    Shadow health minister Liz Kendall welcomes voice coach and TV presenter Carrie Grant to the stage to talk about her own experiences of the NHS.

     
  56.  
    1147:
    Carrie Grant TV presenter and former Eurovision Song Contest participant Carrie Grant addresses delegates
     
  57.  
    1146:

    The BBC's Rebecca Keating tweets: Vince Cable's told Hugh Pym Labour's new One Nation brand "sounds quite reasonable"

     
  58.  
    1148:

    Dr Gabriel Scally, a former regional director of public health, says he is yet to meet anyone who has a "convincing explanation" of why the "tumultuous" changes to the NHS are necessary or how they will work.

     
  59.  
    1152:

    "The truth is, they are not meant to work: this is not a re-organisation of the NHS, this is an attempted destruction of the NHS," Dr Scally adds. The institution is being "dismembered" and "privatised", he argues, with "no semblance of local democratic control" of the NHS left.

     
  60.  
    1155:

    "The government has used the credit crunch as an excuse to dismantle the NHS and destroy what remains of the welfare state, that our parents fought for in the Second World War," Dr Alex Scott-Samuel tells delegates, to applause.

     
  61.  
    1157:

    The Conservatives are "hell-bent" on "destroying" the NHS, Dr Alex Scott-Samuel continues. "They can't be allowed to have a second term and finish off the job. We've got the protect the NHS."

     
  62.  
    1205:

    Chair Angela Eagle politely interrupts delegate Dilys Greenhalgh's speech to tell her she's run out of time. "There'll have to be some hanky panky if you don't leave the platform now," Ms Eagle jokes. "I'm sorry I can't hear you," the delegate confesses, as she continues. "That's a nice try," Ms Eagle quips, but the delegate presses on, exclaiming that "I'm nearly finished". "No, no, no," Ms Eagle says - but Mrs Greenhalgh has the crowd - including shadow chancellor Ed Balls - on her side, as they shout "More! More!". She gets to finish her speech - to a standing ovation.

     
  63.  
    1211:

    On BBC Two now, former Labour home secretary Jacqui Smith, John Prescott, Andy Burnham and Yvette Cooper feature on the Daily Politics. And.. Is Ed Miliband posh or not? Find out live on BBC's iPlayer here

     
  64.  
    1212:
    Dilys Greenhalgh Morecambe delegate Dilys Greenhalgh gets a standing ovation after a speech laced with humour
     
  65.  
    1212:

    Political journalist Gaby Hinsliff tweets: Just seen Nigel Havers in #lab12 conf hotel. It's all gone a bit more One Nation than I thought.

     
  66.  
    1213:
    Shadow chancellor Ed Balls The shadow chancellor joins in the chorus of chants to let delegate Dilys Greenhalgh finish her humourous speech
     
  67.  
    1222:

    Chair Angela Eagle MP is doing her best to hurry things along as conference runs further behind schedule - shadow health secretary Andy Burnham was scheduled to address delegates at 11.45am.

     
  68.  
    1226:

    But here he is - the shadow health secretary is on his feet addressing delegates from the podium.

     
  69.  
    1228:

    Elsewhere today, former home secretary Jacqui Smith tells the BBC's Daily Politics she's "not hung up" on the 50p top rate of income tax. She says if more could be raised with a lower rate of tax, she'd be "happy with that".

     
  70.  
    1230:

    Back in the conference hall and speaking about the government's NHS reforms, Andy Burnham warns: "Cameron's great NHS carve-up is coming to your community." He claims the "single biggest act of privatisation" in the health service's history is underway.

     
  71.  
    1232:

    Mr Burnham takes a pop at Jeremy Hunt, appointed health secretary in David Cameron's recent Cabinet reshuffle. "Never before has the NHS been lumbered with a secretary of state with so little belief in it. It's almost enough to say 'come back Lansley'," he mocks.

     
  72.  
    1233:

    He says Labour is the NHS's "best hope" and urges the party to "defend it on the ground in every community in England".

     
  73.  
    1236:

    From the BBC's Kayte Rath, in Manchester: Over at the NUT stall, conference goers have been revealing what their favourite children's book is. Here's deputy leader Harriet Harman's choice...

    Harriet Harman writes down her favourite book
     
  74.  
    1236:

    Mr Burnham pledges to repeal the NHS Act if elected. "We will stop the sell-off, put patients before profits, restore the N in NHS," he declares. It goes down well in the hall, as delegates rise to their feet and applaud the shadow health secretary.

     
  75.  
    1238:

    From the BBC's Kayte Rath, in Manchester: Meanwhile, Hugh Grant apparently went for The Naughtiest Girl in the School by Enid Blyton and Adam Boulton of Sky News picked Paddington Bear...

    NUT children's book stall
     
  76.  
    1238:

    Labour should be proud of its record on waiting lists and patient satisfaction, shadow health secretary Andy Burnham says. But it also got some things wrong, he adds. Some PFI deals were "poor value for money" and elderly care "simply wasn't good enough".

     
  77.  
    1240:

    "We can get better results for people if we think of one budget, one system caring for the whole person - with councils and the NHS working closely together," Mr Burnham tells conference. "All options must be considered - including full integration of health and social care," he adds, to applause.

     
  78.  
    1242:

    The shadow health secretary is focusing his remarks on care services. He stresses the importance of placing mental health care at "the heart" of the NHS.

     
  79.  
    1244:

    "The NHS is at a fork in the road. Two directions: integration or fragmentation. We have chosen our path," he says proudly. "Not Cameron's fast-track to fragmentation. But whole-person care."

     
  80.  
    1246:

    Labour is the only real hope for the NHS, Mr Burnham reiterates, then adds: "Now fight for it - and we will win."

     
  81.  
    1249:
    Shadow Cabinet colleagues and TV presenter Carrie Grant A strong show of support for Andy Burnham as he wraps up his speech
     
  82.  
    1254:

    The Daily Mail's Tim Shipman tweets: Charlie Falconer says 'Ed is exposing himself'. I hope that's not the plan for the Q&A!

     
  83.  
    1254:

    Shadow foreign secretary Douglas Alexander is introducing two leading figures from the Arab Spring: Ms Samia Tnani, of the Democratic Forum for Labour and Liberties, Tunisia and Dr Hania Sholkamy, a founding member of the Egyptian Social Democratic Party. Mr Alexander commends the women for working "tirelessly" for democratic change in their countries.

     
  84.  
    1306:

    "This flawed franchise system does not appear to be working well for taxpayers," shadow transport secretary Maria Eagle tells the BBC's Daily Politics, under sustained questioning on the bidding process for operating the West Coast rail line. But she stops short of saying her party will support renationalisation of the railways.

     
  85.  
    1308:

    Labour MP Diana Johnson tweets: Excellent speech by @AndyBurnhamMP slamming Lib Dem betrayal of our NHS, pledging a Labour Government to repeal of the NHS Bill. #Lab12

     
  86.  
    1310:

    In the conference hall, Dr Hania Sholkamy says Egypt needs a new politics that puts women at the heart of its future, "because the exclusion of women from the workplace, public spaces or politics is a crime and an absurdity".

     
  87.  
    1312:

    The Labour Party tweets an invitation: We're doing a Q&A with Ed Miliband later this afternoon - tweet us your questions. #lab12

     
  88.  
    1315:
    A delegate sitting among empty seats in the conference hall Is that seat taken? The audience dwindles as conference nears a much-delayed lunch-break
     
  89.  
    1318:

    The conference has now taken a break for lunch. Expect the hall to start filling up again in time for a Q&A session with Labour leader Ed Miliband at 2.30pm.

     
  90.  
    1325:

    Times columnist David Aaronovitch tweets: Imagine how badly the rail tendering process might have gone had the then minister, Justine Greening, not had a business background.

     
  91.  
    1327:

    The BBC's Norman Smith tweets: Maria Eagle calls for #westcoast line franchise to be given to not for profit DOR company that runs east coast line #wato

     
  92.  
    1334:

    The debacle over the West Coast mainline franchise is an "absolute disaster" for the rail industry, trade magazine Modern Railways' Roger Ford has said. Both ministers and civil servants were to blame, he told BBC Radio 4's the World at One.

     
  93.  
    1339:

    But shadow transport secretary Maria Eagle takes a different view on how to apportion blame. Coalition ministers completely redesigned franchise agreements when they took office, she tells BBC Radio 4's the World at One, therefore: "The gross incompetence and mess that we've seen is their mess."

     
  94.  
    1344:

    Labour MP and aide to Ed Miliband John Denham says the party's new "one nation" slogan "is an idea we will use repeatedly in the months to come". He's speaking to Martha Kearney on Radio 4's World at One programme. You can listen to it on the BBC's online radio player.

     
  95.  
    1350:

    But there's one Labour man who's not as fond of all things "one nation" as some of his colleagues. "Who the hell is Disraeli?" Lord Prescott asked Andrew Neil on the BBC's Daily Politics this lunchtime. He went on: "We've had new Labour, old Labour, all sorts of Labour. I'm just Labour." You can watch the whole interview here.

     
  96.  
    1356:
    John Prescott "You know I'm not an intellectual; I've proved that over the years, haven't I?" Lord Prescott asks Andrew Neil
     
  97.  
    1358:

    So it's almost 24 hours since Ed Miliband delivered his conference speech. Now they've had time to think, what are the commentators saying? Patrick O'Flynn in the Express says a "confident communicator" has replaced the "geek". But he feels Ed Miliband is still "weak on substance".

     
  98.  
    1407:

    The Telegraph says Ed Miliband's "virtuoso" display proves he can carry out his job "with panache". The Labour leader dressed up "a distinctly old Labour message... as one nation politics". Mr Miliband was once described privately by Conservatives as their "secret weapon", the editorial says. But he now poses a threat to "David Cameron and his team".

     
  99.  
    1411:

    Over at the Guardian, Polly Toynbee reckons Mr Miliband's speech cast his him as "a man with the hunger and the wit to win". She thinks the one nation Labour label is a "stroke of genius", reaching as it does "back into history to damn David Cameron with a killer phrase stolen from his own party's heritage".

     
  100.  
    1423:

    The Labour leader's speech means the race for Number 10 is now "real", Evening Standard columnist Matthew D'Ancona writes. Detecting the "hand of Alastair Campbell" in Ed Miliband's script, he says watchers didn't get "Red Ed... but something much more effective".

     
  101.  
    1425:

    The hall is filling up for Ed Miliband's question session, due to start in five minutes

    Conference hall
     
  102.  
    1429:

    The Times' Ann Treneman tweets a review of the shadow home secretary's conference speech: Yvette Cooper curiously lacklustre today. Without Andrew Mitchell, it would have been quite devoid of spark..

     
  103.  
    1433:

    PoliticsHome.com's Paul Waugh tweets: Marvin Rees, Lab mayoral candidate, is up at conference. One to watch this guy. Remember the name.

     
  104.  
    1434:

    To wind up our lunchtime look at how the papers received Ed Miliband's speech, the normally critical Daily Mail hasn't changed its position. Their editorial says that "again and again he gave voice to widespread public concerns" - on banks and prices. But it alleges that the speech was "profoundly dishonest". Mr Miliband has "a great deal further to go" before he can convince the country he's ready to be PM, the paper concludes.

     
  105.  
    1437:

    Martin Rees, Labour candidate for Bristol Mayor, is speaking ahead of the afternoon session with the Labour leader. He says Ed Miliband "has to be the next prime minister of our country", to applause.

     
  106.  
    1438:

    "Britain needs his values and integrity," Mr Rees adds, as he welcomes a jacket-less Mr Miliband onto the stage.

     
  107.  
    1438:

    The Telegraph's James Kirkup tweets: The point about Labour's Martin Rees it not that he's impressive. It's that an impressive pol is seeking to be an elected mayor, not an MP

     
  108.  
    1440:

    "So here we are again, 24 hours later," Mr Miliband begins. He says his speech to conference on Tuesday "sets a clear direction of travel for the party", explaining his "one-nation" concept.

     
  109.  
    1441:

    Ed Miliband repays the compliment to Martin Rees. "He's going to be a great mayor of Bristol," the Labour leader says.

     
  110.  
    1444:

    You can expect to be hearing a lot more of one-nation Labour, he tells delegates.

     
  111.  
    1444:

    The Daily Mail's Tim Shipman tweets: Ed gets hall to clap police officers. Apparently he is not Andrew Mitchell. Got that, Britain?

     
  112.  
    1444:

    Turning to the West Coast mainline "fiasco", the Labour leader says it's a "disgrace" it could cost £40m to reimburse four companies for the cost of their bids, and demands David Cameron "get a grip" on his "incompetent" cabinet.

     
  113.  
    1446:

    "He needs to tell us who knew what, when. Who was overseeing this bid?" he demands to know.

     
  114.  
    1447:

    The Independent's John Rentoul - a staunch Blairite - tweets: Ed M in Q&A has just solved problems of managing franchises: all PM has to do is "get a grip". Should have thought of that

     
  115.  
    1447:
    Ed Miliband Ed Miliband acknowledges the applause from delegates as he arrives on stage for his Q&A session
     
  116.  
    1452:

    Responding to his first question, Ed Miliband says fast-food retailers have a responsibility "in terms of public health" but cautions against "outsourcing" public health strategy to them "which I fear is what happens a bit under this government".

     
  117.  
    1453:
    Dave Allen Very much on message: delegate Dave Allen greets his party leader, "Good afternoon, next prime minister."
     
  118.  
    1455:

    "I gave you a kiss at the south-east conference," one delegate tells the Labour leader, "you've obviously forgotten me". Laughing, Mr Miliband replies: "I remember, I remember, I promise."

     
  119.  
    1458:

    PoliticsHome.com's Paul Waugh notices: There's a bloke waving an umbrella to get EdM's attention in this Q&A. No, really. #itsraininged

     
  120.  
    1500:

    Ed Miliband tells the audience that Chancellor George Osborne believes "you have either a good environment or a good economy". He's wrong, says Mr Miliband: "You can have both."

     
  121.  
    1502:

    Ed Miliband says the living wage "is not a panacea" but it will "make a difference over and above the minimum wage". Tax credits are also important, he adds, before criticising government cuts to benefits.

     
  122.  
    1503:
    Eileen Warham Delegate Eileen Warham reminds the Labour leader of the time she gave him a kiss
     
  123.  
    1504:

    The Labour leader is talking about the importance of the environment and tackling climate change for future generations.

     
  124.  
    1505:
    Ed Miliband The Labour leader in full flow at his Q&A session with party delegates
     
  125.  
    1507:

    Ed Miliband is put under pressure from one delegate, a union member, who criticises the Labour leader and shadow chancellor for backing a public sector pay freeze. "How can you win the support of hundreds and thousands of public sector workers when you continue to repeat this policy?" she asks.

     
  126.  
    1508:
    Jean Butcher Jean Butcher, a Unison member, asks about the public sector pay freeze
     
  127.  
    1514:

    From the BBC's Sean Clare: Away from the Ed Miliband Q&A session, rumours that one Labour MP called for public school-educated members of the shadow cabinet to be sacked. Twitter user Adam Tyndall, who says he works for a Labour peer, earlier tweeted: "Jon Trickett MP just called for Labour to "get rid of" the "2 out of 3 shadow cabinet members who were educated at public school"." But Evening Standard political journalist Pippa Crerar says she was at the meeting and that Mr Trickett "mis-spoke". It was "clear from the context" he meant to say "the cabinet", not the shadow cabinet, she tweets.

     
  128.  
    1519:

    Responding to the public sector pay question, Mr Miliband says he understands workers' "frustration". But, he says, he has to be frank about what would happen if Labour was in power now. "If it's a choice in the cuts that you're making in public spending between jobs and pay, then jobs should come first."

     
  129.  
    1520:

    However, Mr Miliband continues, Labour would cut more fairly than the coalition - whose policies take "no account of whether you're low paid, middle paid or high paid".

     
  130.  
    1520:
    Lachlan Morrison Dressing the part: Nottinghamshire's Lachlan Morrison calls for more builders, plumber and mechanics to become MPs
     
  131.  
    1521:

    "We need a more diverse Parliament... in terms of class background," Ed Miliband responds.

     
  132.  
    1521:
    Delegate at Labour conference A fan of the party? Delegates are seeking novel ways of attracting Ed Miliband's attention
     
  133.  
    1524:

    BBC political correspondent Iain Watson tweets from Manchester: Very Blairite body language - hand movements in particular - from Ed Miliband

     
  134.  
    1528:

    Ed Miliband criticises the Liberal Democrats and Nick Clegg, calling them "accomplices". They're "not a brake" on what the Conservatives are doing, he tells delegates.

     
  135.  
    1533:

    The Labour leader is asked by Chris Gilmour from Scotland whether, in the spirit of "one nation", he will show his support for the trades union marches in London, Glasgow and Belfast on 20 October.

     
  136.  
    1534:
    Ed Miliband Ed Miliband seeks out another question from the party faithful
     
  137.  
    1536:

    Mr Miliband tells him, to applause: "Yes, I will be there."

     
  138.  
    1542:

    We're on to the last set of questions to the Labour leader, who apologises to all the delegates that he will not get round to speaking to.

     
  139.  
    1549:

    There's a big round of applause from the crowd as one delegate urges Mr Miliband to "find the courage" to reject Trident renewal and spend the £100bn on "something more sensible". He responds: "I'm not a unilateralist." But he argues the UK should seek to to retain "the minimum deterrent this country needs".

     
  140.  
    1559:

    Wrapping up the session, Ed Miliband tells the party faithful there is "huge work" to do "together" over the next 12 to 18 months, as he urges them to get involved in shaping the party's next election manifesto.

     
  141.  
    1600:

    "We are the people best placed to unite this country. Friends, let's go and do it," he says, and leaves the stage to a standing ovation.

     
  142.  
    1603:

    And that's a wrap for today. Join the BBC for coverage of the final day at the Labour conference, which will feature speeches from deputy leader Harriet Harman and shadow education secretary Stephen Twigg.

     

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