George Osborne downplays Nick Clegg's 'rich tax' call

 

George Osborne: "I want the wealthy to pay more but I do not want to drive wealth creators away"

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Chancellor George Osborne has warned against "driving away" the UK's "wealth creators" after Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg called for a temporary additional tax on the rich.

Mr Clegg argued that those of "very considerable" means should pay more into the system, leading to an angry reaction from several Tory MPs.

He said this should come in addition to the Lib Dems' proposed "mansion tax".

But Mr Osborne said it was important not to deter business from the UK.

In recent weeks there have been several reported clashes between Liberal Democrats and Conservatives over issues including House of Lords reform, airport expansion and plans to redraw boundaries for House of Commons seats.

'National effort'

In an interview with the Guardian newspaper, Mr Clegg appeared to highlight differences over fiscal policy, by suggesting the government could go beyond his own Liberal Democrats' current policy for a "mansion tax" on properties of a high value.

He said: "In addition to our standing policy on things like the mansion tax, is there a time-limited contribution you can ask in some way or another from people of considerable wealth so they feel they are making a contribution to the national effort?" he said.

Mr Clegg said fairness was key to the next steps in tackling the "longer economic war".

"While I am proud of some of the things we have done as a government, I actually think we need to really hard-wire fairness into what we do in the next phases of fiscal restraint," he said.

"If we don't do that I don't think the process will be either socially or politically sustainable or acceptable."

The tax idea is expected to be debated at next month's Lib Dem conference in Brighton, with party sources suggesting Mr Clegg could eventually present it to the cabinet.

But, during a visit to Sunderland, Mr Osborne said: "I am clear that the wealthy should pay more, which is why in the recent budget I increased the tax on very expensive property transactions.

"But we also have to be careful as a country we don't drive away the wealth creators and the businesses that are going to lead our economic recovery."

For Labour, shadow Treasury minister Chris Leslie said: "Nick Clegg is once again taking the British people for fools. He talks about a tax on the wealthiest, but he voted for the tax cut for millionaires in George Osborne's Budget.

"And he has supported a failing economic plan which has pushed Britain into a double-dip recession and is leading to borrowing going up by a quarter so far this year."

Income tax graphic

Mr Clegg's comments provoked criticism from Conservative MPs.

Bernard Jenkin, who chairs the Commons Public Administration Committee, told the BBC: "If the politics of envy made a country rich, we would be a very rich country.

"I think most rich people are contributing far more in tax than other people.

"I know this is not a fashionable view, but if you go on raising tax on rich people - and that's why, in agreement with Nick Clegg we have had to cut the top rate of tax from 50p to 45p - you drive wealth abroad.

"This is a pre-conference, easy-clap line."

Fellow Conservative MP Mary Macleod said: "This is Nick Clegg saying let's try out a few ideas before party conference, probably will cheer up a few Lib Dems to talk about it. But it isn't government policy."

Discussions about tax and spending will take place before the chancellor's autumn statement.

In his interview, Mr Clegg also hinted at a return to cabinet for former Treasury minister David Laws.

Lib Dem Mr Laws resigned as chief secretary to the Treasury two years ago after admitting he claimed expenses to pay his partner rent.

"I have never made any secret of the fact that I want to see David Laws back in government," Mr Clegg said.

He also promised the coalition would stand by its commitment not to build a third runway at Heathrow, despite growing calls from Tory MPs for a change of heart.

 

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  • rate this
    +158

    Comment number 23.

    The important thing we were promised at the Election was that some of the loopholes that are used to allow the very rich to get out of paying tax altogether are closed.

    Just do that, Nick, the Rich don't need to pay more tax than they already owe, they just need to have the loopholes closed.

    And close the tax havens, too, while you're at it.

  • rate this
    +155

    Comment number 68.

    Stop using the word 'fair' as taxing some people more than others is blatantly not. Gov should be encouraging hard work and success, not penalising it.

    Everyone should pay the same rate; the rich would still pay more in £s! But close the loopholes. Revenues would go up and it would be easy to collect. However, corporation tax must be enforced; funny how Gov doesn't want to take the giants on....

  • rate this
    +127

    Comment number 17.

    As was shown with the Government climb down over charitable donations, the very rich pay their taxes on almost a voluntary basis, it's only the average person who pays what that owe.

    If HMG wants more in taxes then how about making the many huge companies that pay almost no tax cough up instead ? Or are they frightened of upsetting their real friends ?

  • rate this
    +114

    Comment number 184.

    Still no word from the government about tax avoiders : Amazon, Goldman Sachs, Vodaphone, Gary Barlow.....etc

  • rate this
    +113

    Comment number 3.

    I personally disagree, and I am not rich.

    I think everyone should pay 30% tax and remove NI. The rich still pay more because they earn more.

    30% of 100,000 is more than 30% of 10,000 etc.

    Can probably pay for it by closing the 8 hundred trillion tax loopholes currently in existance*

    *figure may be slightly exaggerated.

 

Comments 5 of 1611

 

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