Cameron hails Olympics legacy as cabinet meets at site

 

David Cameron said the 2012 Olympics will bring "a massive legacy" to Britain

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David Cameron has said the 2012 London Olympics will bring "a massive legacy" to Britain, after hosting a cabinet meeting at the site.

The PM's most senior ministers swapped Downing Street for the handball arena at the Olympic Park in east London, to mark 200 days until the Games begin.

Meanwhile the operators for the Aquatics Centre, handball arena and Orbit observation tower were announced.

Mr Cameron praised those who had helped provide venues "on time and on budget".

'Do more exercise'

The Olympics will run from 27 July to 12 August and the Paralympics from 29 August to 9 September.

The operators of six venues have now been secured and organisers say they are confident deals for the remaining two, the stadium and the media centre, will be signed ahead of the opening ceremony.

London 2012 - Begin your journey here

London view

Speaking to reporters at the aquatics centre, Mr Cameron said: "All credit to the people who have been involved in providing these venues, getting them done on time and on budget."

He said the Games would create "a massive legacy", encouraging people across Britain to take up sport and "do more exercise".

"We have spent money and sporting organisations have spent money building great swimming pools in Luton, in the West Country and in Scotland so there are centres like this in other parts of the UK," he said.

"The whole country can benefit from the legacy of the Games because of the inspiration they will bring to people young and old."

'White elephants'

Ahead of the meeting Culture Secretary Jeremy Hunt said that one of the main worries about hosting the Games was ending up with "white elephants" after the event.

"To have got to the situation where six of the eight major facilities now have a proper legacy use is a big milestone and we want to get the other two sorted as well."

Mr Hunt said the fact that the project had been completed on time and to a budget set in 2007 would be good for British business.

Olympic handball arena The handball arena will also host fencing and the Paralympic sport of goalball

The Olympic Park will be home to venues for sports including athletics, water polo, cycling, basketball and hockey.

The main stadium will hold up to 80,000 people.

Details of the new contracts for the three venues are to be set out by the Olympic Park Legacy Company.

It said the new operator of the Aquatics Centre hopes 800,000 people a year will make use of its facilities after the games. The handball arena will become London's third largest site for concerts, shows, exhibitions and sport events.

Ticket problems

The observation tower, the 115m (377ft) ArcelorMittal Orbit, expects to attract up to a million visitors a year.

Last month the Ministry of Defence confirmed that 13,500 military personnel - more than the 10,000 that were deployed to Afghanistan - will be part of the 23,700 security force for the Games.

Meanwhile, the Olympic ticket resale website remains suspended after problems caused London 2012 chiefs to close it on Friday afternoon.

Games organiser Locog said it would reopen once the issues had been fixed - but could not say when that would be.

The main problem appeared to be that the site, run by Ticketmaster, was slow to update sessions which had sold out.

The process was designed to allow people to try to resell their unwanted London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic tickets to others willing to buy them.

Earlier last week it emerged that 10,000 extra tickets - which did not exist - were mistakenly sold for synchronised swimming events.

 

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  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 378.

    373. Grumpyodefox

    Sure they were.....um, it was...you know....nearly had it there for a minute. I MUST get some sort of benefit out of it surely?

    Anyone?

  • Comment number 377.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • rate this
    +2

    Comment number 376.

    DC has been going on about the legacy of the games and the investment, so what will it be, lots of our tax pounds being spent building facilities for sporting events in London, great that does wonders for those who want to participate in other parts of the country. perhaps DC will pay for free transport for those on Western Super Mare to use the pool?

  • rate this
    +2

    Comment number 375.

    372 Johnnydubh

    Sorry - would like to say there would be but some of our gold paving is wearing out down here and needs replacing.

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 374.

    It's unlikely there will be another Olympic Games after this one. The global banking system & other systemic failures will see to that. My advice is to enjoy them if they're your bag but if you're like me you'll dump your TV, get on with living your own life, play the music & relish the arts. Vainglorious DC is barking up the wrong tree for a positive legacy. Monetary reform, however, does it.

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 373.

    Re 335 Pete Hey Pete could you run us through all those benefits again, there was that many I could,nt remember them all. I guess it must be my age! Oh and for the record my grandfather took me to a football match,part of a birthday treat,around 1961 the facecial distortions shouting and hatred, etc put me off sport for life and I will definitly not subject my grandkids to such a horror shows!

  • rate this
    +2

    Comment number 372.

    Will there be any legacy for northern Britain?

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 371.

    Wow. Lots of "Londoners" live in "London".

    Thanks for clearing that one up. I wasn't sure if people in London were called "New Yorkers" or "Norwegians".

  • rate this
    +2

    Comment number 370.

    It will indeed be a BIG legacy. It just won't be a good one.

  • rate this
    +2

    Comment number 369.

    @368 Baron von Letripoffen

    "the place is rubbish most of the time and full of miserable Southern gits anyway. Too many Londoners live there for a start."

    Lol.. This, I feel, should have been the slogan for the Olympic bid: A 'win win' situation.

    If true, we could have said, "Well we told you so!"

    If false, we could have put it down to British dry wit.

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 368.

    At £50 to go to London by First Grate Western no way, I am going to the scum capital of the South again, hosay.

    I eagerly await avoiding London during the Olympics. But then again the place is rubbish most of the time and full of miserable Southern gits anyway. Too many Londoners live there for a start.

  • rate this
    +3

    Comment number 367.

    359.Jacobite
    "As announced on the BBC News earlier tonight there has already been a decline in those taking up sports both adults and especially youngsters"

    ####

    If they are like my daughter the youngsters are glued to their playstations and mobile phones. I reckon that has had more to do with declining fitness levels than anything else.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 366.

    Re 343 Peter Hodge Well said ,saved me another post to not be displayed!

  • rate this
    +3

    Comment number 365.

    the only people it will be huge in a good way for are the mates of david when he sells off the venus at pence in the pound giving them instantly billions of taxpayers money.
    The only ones it will be a huge problem for is the working people who david will ensure pay for his free gifts that he gives to his mates

  • rate this
    +5

    Comment number 364.

    I think what Cameron means is that the 'legacy' will be us paying for this shambles for years and years and years.

  • rate this
    +3

    Comment number 363.

    For London possibly, for the rest of the UK, improbable.

    Up front and honest would be to say the UK is paying £10bn for the honour of hosting the premier sports event in the world and afterwards London might benefit from the stuff built to support it.

    I hope it's a success, but preferably without the bullpoo.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 362.

    Got it at last - knew I recognised him - it's Citizen Smith isn't it. - Seriously, if everyone thought the Olympics was taking from the poor and had no benefit (whether directly or indirectly) I think we might have heard about it. Clearly the majority of people are in favour or have no opinion. And back on topic, of course it's right for the cabinet ministers to be going there.

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 361.

    I suspect the most massive legacy will be illegal immigrants.

  • rate this
    +3

    Comment number 360.

    "Does anyone really fancy competing with Berlin 1936?"

    You can bet he does !!!

  • rate this
    +2

    Comment number 359.

    As announced on the BBC News earlier tonight there has already been a decline in those taking up sports both adults and especially youngsters despite all the politicians hype over these games.

    This has been a waste of taxpayers money which could have and should have been put to far better use, not just to benefit a few.

    What about the NHS, redundancies, lack of housing, etc!!

 

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