RAF to get 'bunker busters' for Libya mission

Enhanced Paveway III bomb One of the new bombs is loaded onto a plane by RAF armourers at a base in Italy

The Royal Air Force is to get 2,000lb "bunker busting" bombs to boost its mission in Libya.

The Ministry of Defence said the Enhanced Paveway III bombs were capable of penetrating the roofs of reinforced buildings.

The MoD said this would enable the RAF to attack command centres and communications nodes in Libya.

Defence Secretary Dr Liam Fox said: "We are not trying to physically target individuals in Gaddafi's inner circle."

The MoD said the bombs had been prepared and could be used in Libya in a matter of hours and would help to protect civilians from being targeted by Libyan leader Colonel Muammar Gaddafi's regime.

Dr Fox said: "The introduction of Enhanced Paveway III bombs is another way in which we are developing our tactics to protect civilians and achieve the intent of United Nations Security Council Resolutions 1970 and 1973.

"We are not trying to physically target individuals in Gaddafi's inner circle on whom he relies but we are certainly sending them increasingly loud messages.

"Gaddafi may not be capable of listening but those around him would be wise to do so," Dr Fox added.

The RAF's arsenal already includes Enhanced Paveway II, Paveway IV, and Dual Mode Seeker Brimstone bombs.

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