James Steen: Initial post mortem tests prove inconclusive

Warwickshire Police has previously described James Steen's death as unexplained Warwickshire Police have described James Steen's death as unexplained

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Initial tests carried out on a man from Northern Ireland found dead in England have proved inconclusive.

Police are treating the death of Newcastle University student, James Steen, as "unexplained."

The body of Mr Steen, 23, from Poyntzpass, County Armagh, was found at a house in Wood Street, Rugby, Warwickshire on Saturday.

Three men from Rugby, aged 31, 29 and 25, were arrested on Saturday morning but have since been released on bail.

'Loved life'

James Steen's parents have paid tribute to their "darling son."

"Words simply can not convey the pain we are currently experiencing," they said.

"James enriched our lives, and the lives of others, in so many ways. He was a kind, caring, intelligent and very talented young man, with a generous spirit. He touched everyone he met with his positivity and his sense of humour.

"He loved life. We are devastated by James' untimely death, but we are comforted by knowing how much he was loved and admired by his family, friends and university colleagues," they added.

"We are immensely proud of our son, and all he achieved and the significant mark he made during his brief time on this earth."

'Impressive academic ability'

Newcastle University and The School of Arts and Cultures said: "This really sad news has come as an awful shock.

"James was an extremely bright and ambitious young man.

"He was a pleasure to teach, always polite to staff and fellow students, and committed to his studies on the degree programme.

"We will remember him for his hard work, impressive academic ability and, most of all, his kindness to all.

"Our thoughts are with his family and friends at this difficult time."

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