Killer driver Harry Marley jailed on new charges

Debbie McComb Marley killed schoolgirl Debbie McComb in 2002

Related Stories

A man who served a prison sentence for causing the death by dangerous driving of a west Belfast schoolgirl, has been jailed over new motoring offences.

Henry Christopher 'Harry' Marley, 31, will spend 15 months in custody and a further 15 months on supervised licence when he is released.

He committed the offences in March last year whilst disqualified from driving.

That ban was imposed when he was jailed for causing the death by dangerous driving of 15-year-old Debbie McComb.

The teenager died after she was hit crossing the Springfield Road in March 2002 by a stolen car driven by Marley.

Belfast Crown Court heard that on 3 March last year, police responded to a road traffic collision in the Dermott Hill Road area of the city during which a car crashed into two parked vehicles.

Witnesses said that following the crash, the male driver ran from the scene.

Following enquiries, officers called at the address of the owner of the vehicle that had crashed into the other cars, and located Marley, whose address was given as Maghaberry Prison, but who is formerly from Riverdale Park South in Belfast .

It emerged the car belonged to Marley's partner, who told police: "I didn't let him drive. He took it before I even noticed."

'Appalling driving record'

When he was arrested, Marley told officers he got into the car and drove as he was in fear of his life.

He subsequently pleaded guilty to several offences, including driving whilst disqualified and aggravated vehicle taking causing criminal damage.

Passing sentence, the judge spoke of Marley's "appalling driving-related record", but said that when he took the vehicle, Marley "may have felt threatened and tried to escape the threat".

In addition to the 30-month sentence, Judge Kerr also banned Marley from driving for 10 years.

More on This Story

Related Stories

More Northern Ireland stories

RSS

Features

Try our new site and tell us what you think. Learn more
Take me there

Copyright © 2015 BBC. The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.