Philomena, partly shot in County Down, gets four Oscar nominations

Dame Judi Dench Part of Philomena was filmed in the foothills of the Mourne Mountains

The movie Philomena, partly filmed in County Down, has been nominated for four Oscars including best picture.

The film is based on the true story of an Irish woman who was forced to give up her son.

Best actress nominee Dame Judi Dench spend four days filming in Killyleagh, Bryansford and Rostrevor, where she met some long-lost relatives.

It was also nominated for best original score and adapted screenplay for its writers Steve Coogan and Jeff Pope.

Dame Judi said: "This is just the loveliest news. I'm so happy for everybody involved, and so proud to have been part of the wonderful experience that Philomena has been."

U2 at the Golden Globes U2 won a Golden Globe for Ordinary Love, as featured in Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom

Irish actor Michael Fassbender was nominated in the best supporting actor category for his role in 12 Years a Slave.

Dublin band U2 were nominated for best original song for Ordinary Love, which featured in Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom.

It is the second nod for the group, who were previously nominated in 2003 for their song The Hands That Built America, from Gangs of New York.

The winners will be announced at the Oscars ceremony on Sunday 2 March at the Dolby Theatre in Los Angeles, hosted by Ellen DeGeneres.

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