Price 'did not mention Jean McConville' in Boston College tapes

Jean McConville Jean McConville was abducted and murdered in 1972

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IRA bomber Dolours Price did not mention murder victim Jean McConville in interviews for Boston College, it has been claimed.

The Police Service of Northern Ireland is seeking access to tapes of the interviews as part of the investigation into Mrs McConville's murder.

"Dolours Price did not once mention the name Jean McConville," said Ed Moloney the research project's former director.

Mrs Conville was abducted and murdered by the IRA in 1972.

"The subject of that unfortunate woman's disappearance is not even mentioned. Not once," Mr Moloney said in a statement.

"Neither are the allegations that Dolours Price was involved in any other disappearance carried out by the IRA in Belfast, nor that she received orders to disappear people from Gerry Adams or any other IRA figure," he added.

"None of this is in her interviews with Anthony McIntyre."

Mr Moloney is challenging a PSNI legal bid to obtain a transcript of the interview with Old Bailey bomber Dolours Price.

That and other interviews, part of a research study called the Belfast Project, are held securely at the Burns Library at Boston College, where the intention was to preserve them for future academic research

Participants were told the content of their interviews would be confidential and not be made public until after their deaths.

Ed Moloney has always refused to say which former IRA and UVF members had taken part in the project.

Police became interested in the tapes after a newspaper reported interviewing Dolours Price, who confirmed that she had been one of the interviewees.

Furthermore, the paper claimed that in the Boston interview, she had admitted to having played a role in the disappeared, people abducted, murdered and secretly buried by the IRA, and specifically the abduction of mother of ten Mrs McConville.

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