Bank wrecked my company Quinn tells court

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Bankrupt businessman Sean Quinn has told a court that the former Anglo Irish Bank wrecked his company and made him into a criminal in Irish society.

Mr Quinn was being questioned by lawyers for the Irish Bank Resolution Corporation.

They claim Mr Quinn, with his nephew and son, breached orders preventing them from interfering with international property assets.

Mr Quinn said that he had trusted Anglo and they had let him down.

The IBRC alleges Mr Quinn, his son, Sean and nephew Peter were involved in trying to transfer assets out of the reach of the bank.

In the Dublin court, Senior Counsel Paul Gallagher cross-examined Mr Quinn about the assignment of debts of more than €100 million relating to a valuable property asset owned by the Quinns in Moscow.

Mr Quinn told Mr Gallagher that he was 65 years of age and had never been involved in any litigation, had never been in the High Court and had been well able to run a business until his company had become involved with Anglo.

Anglo had people on three continents he said, wrecking his business, wrecking the country and wrecking his reputation.

He told Mr Gallagher he could ridicule him as much as he liked but he was there to tell the truth.

Mr Quinn said Anglo had taken the Quinns' money, their company and their pride and now they wanted to put them in prison.

He also accused the bank of trying to stop the truth coming out.

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