NI's latest safety ad targets psychology of song

Police drink drive test Road safety campaign will use power of song

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A new hard-hitting road safety campaign will use the psychology of song to get the road safety message across.

It links powerful pictures from advertisements, with the song "I Can't Take My Eyes (Off You)".

The creators hope that the music by Avrutin will trigger the images in the listener's head and make their dangerous driving message hit home.

The campaign is being launched at the most dangerous time of year - the run-up to Christmas.

The latest ad will feature images from Northern Ireland's most iconic safety advertisements over the last 15 years.

Message

Environment Minister Edwin Poots said: "I firmly believe that this powerful montage will remind every road user that we must never become complacent on the road.

"Many will remember the iconic images that have had a huge impact on driver behaviour here and which have become part of the culture of Northern Ireland.

"However, there is a generation of young drivers who will now see these images for the first time and I hope they will understand the message we are trying to convey: never take anything for granted on our roads."

Forty-one people have lost their lives on Northern Ireland's roads so far this year. Hundreds more have been seriously injured.

"Over the years, the ads may change but the messages stay the same: pay attention; expect the unexpected; slow down, always wear your seatbelt; never ever drink and drive," said Mr Poots.

"These messages, if you heed them, could save your life."

The Department of Environment has selected five programmes during which to run the campaign from October to December including The X Factor final and I'm a Celebrity final.

The first showing of the extended edit is on Monday 11 October at 2115 BST during Whitechapel on UTV.

The anti-speeding campaign "Mess" is a joint DOE/Road Safety Authority production, launched in 2007. It carries the strapline "The Faster The Speed, The Bigger The Mess".

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