Thirsk Christmas lights fear over £10,000 electricity bill

Generic Christmas lights picture Thirsk's Christmas lights were turned on last month

Organisers of a town's Christmas lights display say they fear having the power supply cut off after receiving a £10,000 electric bill.

Thirsk and District Business Association said energy firm Npower issued the demand for the 2012 display, saying "pay up or we shut you off".

The association said the bill for the lights in 2011 was just £760.

Npower said it did not want to turn the lights off and was "working really hard" to resolve the issue.

Secretary of Thirsk and District Business Association Jill Miller said she had been "amazed" by the bill.

"I just could not believe there were that many zeroes," she said.

She said the association had received letters saying "pay up or we shut you off" after receiving the bill in March.

Appealing to Npower, she said: "Please look at this account. We are a small group of people who raise money to put the lights on in Thirsk and make it beautiful.

"If it's £800 we'll pay it. If it's £10,000 we won't."

An Npower spokesman said it was looking into the matter, adding "nothing will happen on the account till it's been investigated fully".

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