North Yorkshire Police 'not robust on race crimes'

North Yorkshire Police should be far more robust in tackling racially motivated crimes, according to Racial Justice in North Yorkshire (RAJINY).

The voluntary group claim Home Office figures show racially motivated incidents in the county rose by 25% between 2008/9 and 2010/11.

The group said the force was failing to take the issue seriously.

North Yorkshire Police said the rise was due to increased public confidence in reporting race crimes.

RAJINY is a voluntary organisation providing a voice for black and minority ethnic organisations and individuals in North Yorkshire.

'Good relationships'

The group's treasurer, Gary Craig, who is also Professor of Social Justice at the Universities of Hull and Durham, said the number of racially motivated incidents were falling in most police force areas but in North Yorkshire they were continuing to rise.

"Using Home Office statistics there has been a 25% increase since 2008/9," he said.

"There were 168 racist incidents in 2008/9 and 215 in 2010/11.

"This is quite disturbing and I would have liked to see a much more aggressive and public campaign against racism in the area."

He said the police and other public agencies in the area were far too complacent about racism and hate crime.

Assistant Chief Constable of North Yorkshire Police Sue Cross said she was concerned that racist attacks were still happening in York and North Yorkshire.

She added: "I think the work we do is effective and I see the rise in reports of racism hate crime as a positive because it shows people are more confident in reporting the crime."

The assistant chief constable also said the force was far from complacent about racially motivated crimes.

"We have very good relationships with minority groups in York and North Yorkshire," she added.

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