Objectors to York Monks Cross development meet

Related Stories

A new shopping development in the Monks Cross area of York would take millions out of the city centre, campaigners claim.

The Campaign for York group said the plans, which include retail units and a community stadium, would set a precedent for out-of-town shopping.

Developers insist the scheme would create hundreds of jobs and ensure the survival of the city's football club.

Objectors have held a public meeting in the city to discuss in their concerns.

Oakgate (Monks Cross) Ltd is proposing to construct a new stadium, new retail units and provide new community facilities at Monks Cross on the edge of the city.

An initial planning application will be considered by the City of York Council in December.

The Campaign for York group has been formed to fight the plans.

It claims the expansion would effectively double the size of the existing shopping area at Monks Cross.

The group said planning consultants GVA have suggested the scheme could take £83 to £95m annually out of the city centre economy.

Oakgate say the proposals would create around 1,000 full-time equivalent jobs at Monks Cross and would improve the city's overall retail offer.

The plans are also supported by York City FC who have previously said the new stadium was the only way to guarantee its long-term future.

More on This Story

Related Stories

The BBC is not responsible for the content of external Internet sites

BBC York & North Yorkshire

Weather

York

16 °C 10 °C

Features

  • HandshakeKiss and make up

    A marriage counsellor on healing the referendum hurt


  • Pellet of plutoniumRed alert

    The scary element that helped save the crew of Apollo 13


  • Burnt section of the Umayyad Mosque in the old city of AleppoBefore and after

    Satellite images reveal Syria's heritage trashed by war


  • Woman on the phone in office10 Things

    The most efficient break is 17 minutes, and more nuggets


  • Amir TaakiDark market

    The bitcoin wallet with controversial users


BBC © 2014 The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.