Prince William calls for continued support of injured personnel

Tedworth House in Tidworth is one of four new Help for Heroes recovery centres in England

The Duke of Cambridge has called on the public to continue their support of injured British servicemen and women.

Prince William made the appeal as he and Prince Harry opened a new Help for Heroes recovery centre in Wiltshire.

Tedworth House in Tidworth is one of four new units in England which will offer respite care and rehabilitation to injured and sick service personnel, veterans and their families.

The other three centres are located in Catterick, Colchester and Plymouth.

The centre in Wiltshire can accommodate 50 residents, four families and more than 150 day visitors.

And Prince William said he and Prince Harry were "very, very proud" to see the work being carried out there.

"We must not let the wounded men and women of our armed forces down," he said.

"This official opening is therefore, I hope, much of a renewed pledge by all of us to go on supporting those who sacrificed so much as it is a celebration of an amazing achievement."

During the two hour visit the princes met wounded service personnel and their families.

'Just you wait'

Prince William was given a teddy bear and white babygro with the words "my daddy is a hero" by two-and-half-year-old Jenson Boggi.

Jenson is the son of Corporal Josh Boggi, 26, who lost his right arm and both legs when he served in Afghanistan.

When asked by Cpl Boggi whether he was looking forward to becoming a father, the Prince replied: "Yes. All the mothers have been looking for me, [saying] 'just you wait, just you wait.'"

The princes were also shown the Phoenix Centre - a training facility which includes a full-size sports hall, swimming pool and gym.

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