Dance for Burma teacher Ben Hammond struck by car

Ben Hammond dancing across the Second Severn Crossing Ben Hammond was struck by the car in Polsham near Wells on Wednesday night

Related Stories

A Wiltshire teacher who is dancing from John O'Groats to Land's End to raise awareness of the situation in Burma has been struck by a car.

Ben Hammond, 34, from Bradford-on-Avon and an unnamed cyclist were hit by a car in Polsham near Wells on Wednesday night.

Avon and Somerset Police arrested a 25-year-old woman from Wookey nearby.

Mr Hammond is currently in Yeovil Hospital receiving treatment for cuts and bruises.

He is expected to be discharged shortly and will continue on with his challenge.

The driver, Alanna Rugg, has been charged with drinking and driving, failing to stop at the scene of an accident and failing to report an accident.

She has been bailed to appear at South Somerset Magistrates' Court on 19 October.

'Yellow tutu'

Mr Hammond was nearing the end of his challenge, which is also raising funds for human rights in Burma.

He said he was inspired to take up the mission after he taught in a refugee camp on the Thai/Burma border and was shocked by the lack of freedom the people had.

Wearing a neon yellow tutu, he set off on 13 August, and plans to finish in the next two weeks.

The teacher set up LearnBurma in 2011, a registered charity which works to educate young people in the UK about the Asian country.

The dance challenge is raising money for Amnesty International, Burma Campaign UK, Partners Relief and Development and Prospects Burma.

More on This Story

Related Stories

The BBC is not responsible for the content of external Internet sites

More England stories

RSS

Features

  • chocolate cake and strawberriesTrick your tongue

    Would this dessert taste different on a black plate?


  • Duke and Duchess of Cambridge and Prince George leaving New Zealand'Great ambassadors'

    How New Zealand reacted to William, Kate - and George


  • Major Power Failure ident on BBC2Going live

    Why BBC Two's launch was not all right on the night


  • Front display of radio Strange echoes

    The mysterious 'numbers stations' left over from the Cold War era


  • A letter from a Somali refugee to a Syrian child'Be a star'

    Children's uplifting letters of hope to homeless Syrians


BBC © 2014 The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.