Tyne & Wear

Nobel Peace Prize medal stolen in Newcastle

Nobel Prize
Image caption The medal was awarded to Arthur Henderson for his work on international disarmament

A £150,000 haul of valuables including a gold Nobel Peace Prize medal have been stolen during a raid at the lord mayor of Newcastle's mansion house.

Police believe the raiders broke in through the cellar of the property in Fernwood Road in Jesmond overnight between Monday and Tuesday.

The medal was awarded to Newcastle's Arthur Henderson in 1934 for his work on international disarmament.

The haul also includes a lock of hair from naval Admiral Lord Collingwood.

Lord Mayor Jackie Slesenger does not live at the house.

A spokesman for Newcastle City Council said: "The mansion house is where we carry out our civic receptions and where we receive visitors."

Labour Party Foreign Secretary Mr Henderson was awarded his prize for his efforts to bring about international disarmament in the run up to WWII.

Historically important

Supt Bruce Storey, of Northumbria Police, said: "Some of the items taken in this burglary are very uncommon and we are asking the public to keep their eyes open for them.

"One of the items is a Nobel Peace Prize, dating back to 1934 when it was awarded to Newcastle's Arthur Henderson for his work on international disarmament - it is extremely rare, recognisable and historically important."

The medal bears the inscription "Parlimentum Norvegial A Munro Henderson" and is with a presentation scroll in a leather case.

Image caption Police said silverware was taken from the house in Jesmond

Other antique silverware taken includes silver cups dating back to 1919, a set of four Victoria napkin rings embossed with a star from 1875 and a William IV snuff box dating back to 1834.

Other valuables include a George II mustard pot from 1759 and a Queen Anne silver love cup engraved with the Queen Anne coat of arms.

Admiral Collingwood was born in 1748 and is celebrated in the North East for his career at sea, which spanned more than four decades.

He is best known for taking control of the British fleet during the Battle of Trafalgar, after Admiral Lord Nelson was killed.

There is a monument to him at Tynemouth and several streets bear his name.

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