Air pollutants in Woking above government target levels

Car exhaust generic Woking Borough Council has blamed vehicle exhaust fumes for the pollution

Two Surrey councils have said they will be working together to improve air quality as readings showed levels of a pollutant above government targets.

Readings of nitrogen dioxide were almost 20% above the government's national objective levels in Anchor Hill in Knaphill.

Surrey County Council and Woking Borough Council said an air quality action plan would be produced.

Woking council said the higher readings were due to pollution from vehicles.

Air quality is monitored regularly via 24 nitrogen dioxide tubes located around the borough.

Anchor Hill was found to have a reading of 47.7 micrograms per cubic metre, with the government's objective level being 40 micrograms.

Councillor Beryl Hunwicks, from Woking Borough Council, said: "The air quality within Woking borough is monitored regularly and it's positive that generally, the air quality in the borough is good.

"However, the reading in Anchor Hill is slightly higher than we would hope."

The junction of Lower Guildford Road, Highclere Road and High Street, Knaphill has been declared an air quality management area.

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