Two loose horses killed on A14 near Ipswich

Two horses have died after being hit by a vehicle on the A14 near Ipswich.

Police received reports that five horses were loose on the road close to the Whitehouse junction at about 01:15 BST.

They found two of the animals, who they believe came from a nearby travellers site, had been killed but did not find the vehicle which hit them.

A driver who witnessed the aftermath, but wanted to remain anonymous, said it was "like a blood bath".

They said: "I can't explain how traumatic it was to have to come across the dead animals in total darkness.

"(My) heart goes out to the owners. No-one wants to wake up to find their animals are dead but it does leave questions unanswered as to how they got there in the first place."

Helicopter sweep

The road was closed for over an hour while it was cleaned.

Insp Richard Hill said: "The scene wasn't very pleasant for officers or anyone who witnessed it."

He said a helicopter had swept the area.

"We had some concerns as nobody had stopped and told us they had been involved in the accident, so we wanted to clarify the vehicle hadn't hit the animals and then gone into a ditch somewhere," he said.

"There's nobody obvious that has been involved. It is a reportable accident, so ideally we do need to speak to the driver still."

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