Council warns of falling conkers in Bury St Edmunds

Local Government minister Bob Neill said officials in Bury St Edmunds were being "health and safety zealots"

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A council in Suffolk has pinned a warning notice to a horse chestnut tree after a passerby was hit on the head by a falling conker.

The Beware Falling Conkers sign in Abbey Gardens in Bury St Edmunds advises walkers to proceed with care.

A spokeswoman for St Edmundsbury Borough Council said it was a courtesy to visitors.

She said a walker suffered a cut head and parks staff had decided to issue a warning.

Autumn pastimes

"A couple of people came into our parks office after one had been hit by falling conkers and asked if we could warn people at this time of year," said the spokeswoman.

"So, as a courtesy to our many Abbey Gardens visitors, we have put up a temporary notice.

"The notice will stay there until the conkers have fallen to the ground - and they are then free to be used by children, or indeed visitors of any age, as they always have done for conker contests or similar autumn pastimes. "

She said the council did not have a "a health and safety policy about conkers" and did not have warning signs on any other trees.

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