Staffordshire drug and alcohol treatment 'to rise by 20%'

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About 20% more people with drug and alcohol addictions are to get treatment in Staffordshire, the county council has pledged.

Under new contracts, about 2,500 would be in treatment at any time, it said.

A review last year showed partners ran 30 contracts with 10 providers, but a new system has just three contracts to reduce duplication, the council added.

Services are "targeted to tackle the root cause of the problem," the council's Robbie Marshall said.

"In addition to treating drug or alcohol addiction, people will get more targeted help to find work or housing, or to deal with breakdowns in relationships, issues that often lead to drinking or drug taking in the first place," the cabinet member for health and wellbeing continued.

"Simplified contract arrangements... cut duplication and mean we can deliver more for the same amount."

The authority, which has public health responsibilities, said drug and alcohol abuse costs the county an estimated £110m every year.

This figure includes about £60m to the NHS and councils through ill health and social care, £20m to the criminal justice system and £30m to employers in sick days and lost productivity, it added.

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