New Rotherham United stadium hosts first football match

Rotherham United's New York Stadium Rotherham United's New York Stadium occupies the site of a former foundry

Rotherham United has played its first game at its new home - the £17m New York Stadium.

The Millers won 2-1 against Barnsley in a pre-season friendly match on Saturday.

The 12,000-seat venue is yet to be fully completed with the capacity reduced to half as flood prevention works continue, the club said.

Chief executive Paul Douglas said fans would however be impressed despite the reduced facilities.

"We've made our fans aware about the ongoing works and issues, and I don't think a couple of kiosks not being opened is a major issue at all," he said.

"It was always going to be a half-capacity for this first game and the next game and nothing's changed."

A spokesman for the club said: "To the naked eye everything appears OK at the ground. We're ready to play football. It's the office side of things that need finishing off."

'National acclaim'

Mr Douglas said there was a huge interest in the stadium, with all 6,000 tickets being sold out for the first game.

The stadium occupies a central position in Rotherham town centre, on the site of the former Guest and Chrimes foundry.

Club chairman Tony Stewart said the venue had already attracted attention from football fans outside South Yorkshire.

"I've had one or two people - Tottenham, Chelsea people - talking and saying 'what's happening in Rotherham?', so it's certainly getting national acclaim because of its style and investment.

"I'm expecting people to come along and have a look at us and see what Rotherham's doing, not just building a stadium but building a town and a culture."

The club has been playing at the Don Valley Stadium in Sheffield since 2008.

More on This Story

Related Stories

The BBC is not responsible for the content of external Internet sites

BBC Sheffield & South Yorkshire

Weather

Sheffield

10 °C 8 °C

Features

  • Witley Court in Worcestershire Abandoned mansions

    What happened to England's lost stately homes?


  • Tray of beer being carried10 Things

    Beer is less likely to slosh than coffee, and other nuggets


  • Spoon and buckwheatSoul food

    The grain that tells you a lot about Russia's state of mind


  • Woman readingWeekendish

    The best reads you need to catch up on


  • Salim Rashid SuriThe Singing Sailor

    The young Omani who became a pre-war fusion music hit


BBC © 2014 The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.