Notts County FC grow grass with seized cannabis lamps

Heat lamps Police said criminal gangs can invest as much as £20,000 in growing equipment

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Heat lamps confiscated in raids on cannabis farms in Nottinghamshire are being used to help the grass grow at a football league club.

Notts County FC is using equipment seized by police to make lighting rigs for use on the Meadow Lane pitch.

University students are also involved in a project to design and build the rigs, with wheels for them being donated by a local golf club.

Supt Mark Holland said it was a "win, win" situation for all involved.

Greener grass
Greg Smith Mr Smith said the lighting rigs would help the grass grow during the winter

"This property would normally be crushed, so it is important it gets reused and a lot of people are getting the benefit from it," he said.

Stadium manager Greg Smith said it was "a massive saving for the club".

He said: "Normally to buy one rig you are looking at between £10,000 and £15,000.

"We have both sports at the club, football and rugby, and we've got a main stand that doesn't allow the light in during the winter.

"So, we can have them from the start of October through to the end of February, hopefully growing grass for us."

The grow lights will be used to heat up the soil and replicate warmer conditions.

The club has made a donation to a local charity supported by Nottinghamshire Police as a thank you for the lamps.

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