Nottingham

Fatal Nottinghamshire bull attack 'devastates' farmer

Investigator at the scene
Image caption The couple were attacked while walking through a field

The owner of a bull that killed a man and critically injured his wife has said he is "deeply upset" over the "devastating" attack.

A 63-year-old man from Glen Parva in Leicestershire died after the attack on a public footpath in Stanford on Soar, Nottinghamshire, on Friday.

His 67-year-old wife, who flagged down a motorist for help, is critically ill but stable in hospital.

Paul Waterfall, of Underhill Farm, said the incident had shocked his family.

The farmer, who kept 61 heifers and a bull in the field where the attack took place, said: "My family and I are deeply upset by what has happened."

'Tragic accident'

He added: "We are in shock and trying to come to terms with what I can only describe as a devastating and tragic incident.

"Our thoughts are with the couple's family at this time."

It is unclear why the bull attacked the couple, who have not yet been identified.

Their two sons travelled to be at their mother's bedside in Nottingham's Queen's Medical Centre on Saturday.

A post-mortem examination on their father is expected to take place.

Image caption The farmer kept 61 heifers and a bull in the field

His parents have also been informed of his death.

Police and the Health and Safety Executive are investigating the incident.

According to the Ramblers Association, a farmer is entitled to keep bulls of up to 10-months-old in a field with a public footpath.

Bulls more than 10-months-old of a recognised dairy breed - Ayrshire, British Friesian, British Holstein, Dairy Shorthorn, Guernsey, Jersey and Kerry - are banned from fields crossed by public paths under all circumstances.

All other bulls over 10 months are banned unless accompanied by cows or heifers. If any bulls act in a way which endangers the public, an offence may be committed under health and safety legislation.

Details of the animal relating to this incident have not yet been released.

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