Developments at Thorpe and Wymondham backed by councillors

Two developments in Norfolk with more than 900 new homes in total have been backed by councillors.

About 600 homes at Thorpe, Norwich, alongside an A47 link road and a business park expansion were approved by Broadland District Council.

South Norfolk District councillors approved plans for 323 homes at Wymondham.

The council deferred plans for 257 houses at Costessey for more information on traffic congestion.

'Green corridor'

The Thorpe homes would be developed across woodland and farmland on the Brook Farm and Laurel Farm sites.

Eric Kett, campaigner against the housing plans, said new buildings would "increase the carbon footprint" and that "brownfield" sites should be redeveloped instead.

The building developer's agency said new green spaces would be created to counteract the impact of the new houses.

"We're only developing about half of it. The other half is going to be given back to the community as managed open space," said David Ridel from LSI Architects.

"It'll be mixed woodland, wildflower meadows, a whole range of things which will provide a 'green corridor' towards the city centre."

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