Wythenshawe child sex abuser extradited from France is jailed

Peter Scott wanted poster (left) the 58-year-old's mug shot (right) A 20-year-old photograph of Peter Scott was digitally enhanced show how he could have aged

A serial child sex abuser who fled to France in a bid to avoid justice has been jailed for eight years.

Peter Scott, 58, admitted 17 counts of indecent assault on a child and six offences of gross indecency on a child.

Scott, originally from Wythenshawe, Manchester, abused three children - two were aged 11 - in the 1980s, Manchester Crown Court heard.

A new passport application sparked an alert and he was found sleeping rough in France, arrested and extradited.

Scott had fled the UK from his registered address in Swansea before Greater Manchester Police could speak to him about historical sex abuse allegations made in 2007.

'Unimaginable abuse'

In 2009 police issued wanted posters for Scott and in January of this year he was arrested after his passport renewal application - to help secure permanent accommodation - triggered a police alert.

Officers secured a European Arrest Warrant and Scott was tracked down in Foix, in the south-west of the country.

Det Sgt Suzanne Keenaghan said after the hearing: "Our determination to find Peter Scott was greater than his determination to avoid this day.

"When we realised he may have exiled himself abroad, we put in place a number of controls that meant there was only so much Scott could do without us becoming aware of his whereabouts."

She added: "The abuse that these victims suffered through the years is unimaginable.

"Having spent so much time with them through the whole process, I am able to see first hand the major impact this has had on their lives.

"I just hope now that this may bring some closure to them so that they can try to move on. "

Scott was ordered to sign the sex offenders register for life.

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