Manchester Piccadilly lightning strike disrupts trains

Lightening strike over Manchester Staff at the Network Rail control centre saw a large flash

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Trains from Manchester Piccadilly railway station suffered major disruption after a "massive" lightning strike hit the signalling system.

"Staff at our control centre saw a large flash just outside their window," said Martin Frobisher of Network Rail.

"It damaged all of the signalling equipment and the station came to a standstill."

He said the signalling system had been restored but it would take time for a normal service to resume.

Six operators, including the Virgin Trains service to London, were affected.

Some services were diverted to other stations, while a replacement bus service ran to Manchester Airport.

Tram services have also been disrupted with Transport for Greater Manchester (TfGM) reporting a lightning strike on its depot in Queens Road which affected signalling.

TfGM said: "Passengers travelling on the Altrincham, Bury, Eccles/MediaCityUK and Droylsden lines may experience a delay to their journey this morning."

Greater Manchester Fire Service had to rescue drivers from two cars on Crossley Rd, Burnage, after they got stuck while driving through water.

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