London

'Floating village' plan for River Thames

  • 12 March 2013
  • From the section London
How a floating home could look
Image caption The mayor of London's office said it would be the largest floating development in the UK

A floating village on the Thames could be built after the mayor announced his plans to transform the Royal Docks.

Floating homes, hotels and leisure facilities could be built on a 15-acre (six hectare) area of the Thames.

The village would sit under the cable car and Boris Johnson said he believed it had the potential to become one of London's most sought after addresses.

The mayor said it would have some of the best transport links in London due to Crossrail, DLR and the cable car.

There are floating developments at Ijburg near Amsterdam and HafenCity in Hamburg, as well as others throughout Scandinavia.

The mayor of London's office said this would be the largest floating development in the UK - a 12-acre development is planned in Glasgow.

Image caption The village would be built beneath where the cable car operates

City Hall said the mayor was determined to bring more public land forward for development after he gained more than 1,500 acres (600 hectares) of land as a result of the Localism Act 2012 which saw other London public bodies devolved.

A developer and companies to design and deliver the scheme are now being sought.

Mr Johnson said: "This site is unique. It has the potential to become one of the most sought after addresses in the capital while breathing new life back into London's waterways.

"But it's not alone. Right across London there are incredible investment opportunities that I'm determined to bring to market creating more homes and jobs for Londoners."

Newham Mayor Sir Robin Wales said: "London is moving eastwards and the Royal Docks offer an investment opportunity in scale unmatched anywhere in Europe. This exciting development is a pivotal part of their reanimation."

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