Shard firm lands deal for world's tallest skyscraper

Kingdom Tower Work on the Kingdom Tower is expected to start later this year

Related Stories

The company that built London's Shard skyscraper has been chosen to oversee the construction of a tower in Saudi Arabia set to be the world's tallest.

London-based Mace will team up with British firm EC Harris to create the Kingdom Tower in Jeddah.

When finished, the structure will stand around 3,280 ft (1km) high, more than three times taller than the Shard.

It will be around 558ft (170m) higher than the current tallest building, the 2,717ft (828m) Burj Khalifa in Dubai.

Construction of the Kingdom Tower, which will overlook the Red Sea, is expected to cost around £780m and take more than five years to complete.

It will consist of a five-star hotel, apartments, office space and an observatory.

Mark Reynolds, chief executive of Mace, said: "Kingdom Tower is a project of international importance and immense ambition and we are delighted to be part of the joint venture team tasked with its delivery."

Keith Brooks, head of property and social infrastructure at EC Harris, said: "The Kingdom Tower is a landmark building that will clearly demonstrate Saudi Arabia's ambitions to the world."

The Jeddah Economic Company, which appointed the firms to the project, said it was the vision of Prince Al-Waleed bin Talal.

More on This Story

Related Stories

The BBC is not responsible for the content of external Internet sites

BBC London

Weather

London

Min. Night 16 °C

Features

  • Shinji Mikamo as a boy, and Hiroshima bomb cloudLove and the bomb

    The Japanese man who lost everything but found peace


  • Northern League supporters at the party's annual meeting in 2011Padania?

    Eight places in Europe that also want independence


  • scottie dogShow-stealers

    How Scottie dogs became a symbol of Scotland


  • Hamas rally in the West Bank village of Yatta, 2006Hamas hopes

    Why the Palestinian group won't back down yet


  • The outermost coffin of Tutankhamun 'Tut-mania'

    How discovery of Tutankhamun's tomb changed popular culture


BBC © 2014 The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.