'One Pound Fish' seller records Christmas single

  • 5 December 2012
  • From the section London
Media caption'One pound fish' man on his internet success

A fish seller whose One Pound Fish song received millions of hits on the internet is recording a Christmas single.

Shahid Nazir has swapped his east London market stall for the recording studio after signing a deal with Warner Music.

The 31-year-old's lyrics - "Come on ladies, come on ladies, one pound fish... Have a look, one pound fish" - are now being accompanied by music and a video featuring dancing girls.

"One Pound Fish changed my whole life," Mr Nazir said.

"I'm happy, excited and proud to be in the studio recording my song."

It has been an incredible journey for the market trader who came to England from Pakistan just over a year ago.

X Factor's 'mistake'

He started singing to attract customers to his fish stall in Queen's Market and within months became an internet sensation.

Footage of Mr Nazir singing has received more than eight million hits on the internet and he also appeared on this year's X Factor.

"I didn't get through but Gary Barlow tweeted me to say they've made a mistake," the 31-year-old added.

Now his single is expected to be a contender for the coveted Christmas number one spot.

Anton Partridge, from Warner Music, said he has his "money on it".

"I could see the track got everybody hooked but as much as it's about the song it's about the endearing human story behind it," he said.

Mr Nazir left his wife and four young children in a small town called Pattoki, near Lahore, in Pakistan, to move to London to live what he describes as his "London dream".

He says that people back home are very proud of him.

"There are long queues of relatives and friends bringing my parents sweets to celebrate my success," he added.

However Mr Nazir's current visa is running out so he will have to return to Pakistan by the end of the year.

"Once I go back, I will apply for a work visa and hopefully I can return to the UK," the singer said.

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