Will 'bold' cycle safety report stop deaths?

 

Dr Tom Konig has questioned whether the mayor's cycling superhighways are safe particularly at night

Related Stories

Cycling still has the ability to create headlines and headaches for those running London.

This week saw a report published by the London Assembly and you can see my film report on it here.

On Wednesday we interviewed Dr Tom Konig, a cyclist and doctor with the London Air Ambulance. He regularly sees cyclists who have received life-changing injuries from collisions.

His solution is more segregation, particularly at junctions.

Dr Konig has attended 58 serious cycling incidents so far this year and is extremely frustrated at the lack of action being taken to protect cyclists.

"A number of those 58 this year have died and we are already matching last year's figure and we've still got five or six weeks left of the year," said Dr Konig.

"So, we're not winning that game and sadly those that are losing it, are losing their lives. There is still work to be done."

Start Quote

So, we're not winning that game and sadly those that are losing it, are losing their lives. There is still work to be done.”

End Quote Dr Tom Konig

He is questioning the safety of cycling superhighways, particularly at night, and says cyclists need to be segregated and given respect by motorists.

British Cycling called London Assembly's report 'bold' and what made this report different was it seemed apolitical and it also made firm recommendations:

  • The mayor should establish a far more ambitious target for cycling, bringing forward his target of a five per cent increase in cyclists from 2026 to 2020;
  • The mayor and Transport for London's (TfL) new business plan, due to be published in December, should commit to doubling the amount of funding for cycling;
  • The mayor and TfL should commit to introducing fundamental cycle safety improvements to junctions, based on high quality Dutch/Danish planning and design principles;
  • The mayor and TfL should reassess the space allocated to cycling in the design of cycle route and junction infrastructure;
  • Where there is existing provision for the mayor and TfL to use innovative road design and technological solutions to improve cycle safety, they should do so;
  • The mayor and TfL need to revise the Road Safety Action Plan to reflect the forthcoming independent review of construction HGV vehicle design;
  • TfL should report back to the committee on the steps it is taking with the Metropolitan Police on cycling safety, including increase enforcement of 20mph limits and improved driver awareness.
Boris Johnson cycling with James Cracknell and schoolchildren in 2009 London Assembly's transport committee recommends doubling TfL's funding for cycling

Broadly what it means is more money to improve junctions and more road space to be given over to cyclists which will be extremely contentious.

The assembly is, to some extent, pushing at an open door with some of these proposals, so the question is when will definitive changes be made?

There will be a lot of interest in the mayor's cycling strategy. We would expect more investment and segregation at key junctions.

It sounds like there is some wrangling over the amount of funding that will be available for cycling and presumably other projects will have to be cut back or delayed.

There are also questions over how London will look in the future. Will there be fewer car-free areas in 50 years' time? Will we see more pedestrianised areas?

Also, it'll be interesting to see how the cycling strategy is received as cycling campaigners now feel empowered and are well organised.

Bear in mind, reaction to changes at Blackfriars Bridge and the controversial Bow roundabout has not been favourable.

 
Tom Edwards, Transport correspondent, London Article written by Tom Edwards Tom Edwards Transport correspondent, London

Anatomy of Tour de France costs

The Tour has moved on but what is the legacy of the English stages of the Tour De France 2014 and, in these austere times, who paid for it and how?

Read full article

More on This Story

Related Stories

The BBC is not responsible for the content of external Internet sites

Comments

This entry is now closed for comments

Jump to comments pagination
 
  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 13.

    @Brit Expat, can we get licenses, correct registration plates and insurance for 100% of motorists first? You know, the people who drive 1.5 ton plus vehicles that kill and seriously injure thousands every year. Next, how about better training for drivers and then take licences away from truly dangerous.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 12.

    @ Brit Expat
    "licensed, have number plates, carry insurance"

    Not a good idea as it would be impossible to implement, but I fail to understand how any of it would make cyclists safer on the roads, given that almost all of the danger comes from dangerous or inattentive drivers.

    Perhaps you could elaborate...

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 11.

    Just read the warped and retarded comments on here. I drive a car, I cycle most places, I live in London. Motor vehicles injured more people last year than the population of Luton (source BBC). This is not the same for cyclists. You may think it OK to continually whine about poor cyclists. The simple fact is Cars KILL on a daily basis, cyclists DON'T. Why don't you look where you're going!

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 10.

    They need to be licensed, have number plates, carry insurance and adhere to the rules of the road. Driving in and around London is a challenge when cyclists appear from just about all directions without any due care or respect for other road users.

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 9.

    CYCLIST SHOULD BE BETTER PROTECTED THEY SHOULD ALSO HAVE THEIR BIKE CONFISCATE WHEN THEY ARE CAUGHT WITH NO LIGHTS AND ALL CYCLIST WHO HAVE A DRIVING LINCES SHOULD HAVE POINTS ADD FOR ANY LAWS THAT THEY BREAK ON THEIR BIKES 20MPH IS A GOOD IDEA BUT WHO IS GOING TO STOP THE CLCYLIST FROM DOING OVER 20MPH AND THEY CAN AND DO SO OFTEN YES I USE TO CYCLE ABOUT 200 TO 250 MILES A WEEK

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 8.

    @philjer & others: Cyclist do have responsibility, but often the rules pay them no mind. E.g. a T-junction where cars from the left on the 'upper bar' are stopped at lights to let cars from the upright bar turn into the road; no zebra crossings. A cyclist from the left sticks to the curb, so should not have to stop at the lights. But that may irritate drivers not used to the cyclist's position.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 7.

    Boris is more interested in using his transport budget to build cable cars for tourists than spending money on making life of all road users more efficient in London. There are some parts of central London that are truly terrifying for any road users, such as Hyde Park corner, that need sorting out. There also needs to be better enforcement of road traffic rules for all road users.

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 6.

    4. Brian
    Quite an assumption to make - based on no information whatever. Why do you presume I do?

    philjer's point is clear - he's very quick off the mark to blame cyclists for danger on the roads.

    However, it has been well documented that drivers are at fault in the majority (80+%) of collisions leading to death or injury of cyclists (not to mention pedestrians, on and off the pavement).

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 5.

    There is very little willingness to do much, the area around Kingscross has had loads of work done on it over the last few years but there has been no thought of cyclists!!! The section of road between KC and StP is an accident waiting to happen. A mixture of pedestians not looking out for bikes, taxis doing u-turns, its only time before a cyclist is killed along there!!!

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 4.

    @Stevie D Seems you indulge in this behaviour so do not see the point philjer was making. During his observation no one came to grief, but he does not say how many times other road users had to take avoiding action.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 3.

    Many cyclists need to reassess their own road (and pavement!) manners instead of constantly pointing the finger at others. And I do cycle myself.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 2.

    If this behaviour was such a problem, how many collisions, injuries and deaths did you notice during that hour?

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 1.

    One big problem at junctions, is the large number of cyclists who ignore red lights, often ignoring pedestrians right to cross roads. I recently was sat outside a coffee shop near Moorgate in London for an hour where traffic lights were due to one lane being closed, and all but cyclist ignored the lights and sign to wait and carried on against the flow of on-coming traffic. Unbelievable!

 

Features

BBC © 2014 The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.