London 2012: Black cab drivers protest over Games Lanes ban

Hundreds of taxi drivers joined the protest over a ban on using Olympic traffic lanes

Related Stories

London taxi drivers brought Westminster to a standstill in a protest over their ban from Olympic traffic lanes.

More than 200 black cabs arrived in Parliament Square just before 14:00 BST, beeping their horns to tourists' bemusement.

Cab drivers argue they should be able to use the Games Lanes available only to Olympics officials and athletes.

But Transport for London transport commissioner Peter Hendy condemned the action.

He said he had "no sympathy" for the "trumped-up" demonstration.

'Working city'

Jonathan Myers, of the United Cabbies Group union, said: "There will be no access to these lanes for any traffic apart from the Olympics family.

"Taxis are excluded, which is unacceptable and wrong. This is a working city and we need to get around and do our job."

A spokesman for TfL said there had been discussions with black cab drivers since 2009.

He said they would be able to access some of the special lanes to collect fares, including the nearside Games Lane in Park Lane, central London.

John Mason, Director of London Taxi and Private Hire called the protest "completely irresponsible".

He said: "We strongly urge taxi drivers to ignore calls to join these unnecessary protests and instead show why they are regularly voted the best in the world."

The Metropolitan Police said the planned demonstration affected Whitehall and Trafalgar Square as well as Parliament Square.

More on This Story

Related Stories

The BBC is not responsible for the content of external Internet sites

BBC London

Weather

London

29 °C 16 °C

Features

  • Shinji Mikamo as a boy, and Hiroshima bomb cloudLove and the bomb

    The Japanese man who lost everything but found peace


  • Northern League supporters at the party's annual meeting in 2011Padania?

    Eight places in Europe that also want independence


  • scottie dogShow-stealers

    How Scottie dogs became a symbol of Scotland


  • Hamas rally in the West Bank village of Yatta, 2006Hamas hopes

    Why the Palestinian group won't back down yet


  • The outermost coffin of Tutankhamun 'Tut-mania'

    How discovery of Tutankhamun's tomb changed popular culture


BBC © 2014 The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.