Recorded rape up 53% in London

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There has been a 53% rise in recorded rape in London over the last four years.

In the financial year 2008-2009, there were 2,177 reports of rape to the Metropolitan Police.

But by 2011-2012, that had jumped to 3,334 cases. Some 667 prosecutions have been completed, 369 of which were successful.

A Metropolitan Police spokesman claimed the rise was due to victims feeling more confident about coming forward.

He said: "We believe this rise in recorded crimes is partly due to an increase in victims coming forward to report rape and sexual assaults."

The statistics are from the Crown Prosecution Service.

The CPS said a further 661 people have been charged from the year 2011-2012, with court cases yet to be completed.

'Unacceptable'

Yvonne Traynor, chief executive of Rape Crisis South of London, said: "Women feel more confident they are going to be believed.

"There are more support services around and more a culture of doing everything we possibly can to get the bad guys off the streets."

Start Quote

Our survey shows sexual harassment in London is extremely common”

End Quote Professor Liz Kelly End Violence Against Women Coalition

Meanwhile, a new poll suggests 41% of women in London aged 18-34 have experienced sexual harassment in public spaces over the last year.

The YouGov survey of 523 women, commissioned by the End Violence Against Women Coalition, asked about experiences of unwanted contact or attention, such as wolf-whistling, sexual comments, staring, or exposure of a sexual nature.

Some 21% of women of all ages reported unwanted attention, while 4% had experienced unwanted touching.

Coalition co-chairwoman Prof Liz Kelly said: "Our survey shows that sexual harassment in London is extremely common.

"We need investment in public campaigns on transport and elsewhere saying this behaviour is unacceptable."

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