Budget 2012: London's dangerous cycle junctions get £15m

A group of mothers from Barnet sat and watched the Budget speech

London has been allocated £15m in the Budget to improve safety for cyclists at some of the capital's most dangerous junctions.

Cycle safety campaigners said it was a "good gesture" but they said the money was not sufficient.

Leon Daniels, from TfL, said they welcomed the additional funding.

Mr Osborne also announced that 10 UK cities, including London, would receive ultra fast broadband as part of a £100m investment.

Charlie Lloyd, from London Cycling Campaign, said the £15m allocated for cycle safety was "not enough money".

"It's a good gesture showing people are taking cycling seriously and it will add to the urgency of doing something about the most dangerous junctions.

"But we need to invest more to ensure London is attractive city for cyclists and pedestrians."

The Chancellor said the government would work with London's mayor to invest in "transport, lengthening commuter trains, extending the Underground and exploring new river crossings in east London".

"So from the allocation made to the mayor through the Growing Places Fund he will be creating a new £70m development fund to attract new business and new jobs," he added.

Details of where the money would be invested will be announced in the summer, the government said.

The chancellor said the government's review of airport capacity in London and the south-east of England would also be published this summer.

The country, he said "must confront the lack of airport capacity in the south-east of England - we cannot cut ourselves off from the fastest growing cities in the world".

The Budget gave details of plans for enhanced capital allowances for a London Royal Docks Enterprise Zone in east London, which it said has the potential to deliver 7,500 jobs.

More on This Story

Budget 2012

Related Stories

The BBC is not responsible for the content of external Internet sites

BBC London

Weather

London

Min. Night 9 °C

Features

BBC © 2014 The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.