Campaigners vent anger at TfL over cyclist deaths

 

An unpublished report said "casualties were inevitable" at the site.

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Local campaigners, cyclists and bloggers have highlighted the safety issues of the junction outside Kings Cross station where a cyclist died on 3 October.

In particular, an internal report from Transport for London (TfL) in 2008 highlighted how "aggressive" vehicles were and said "casualties are inevitable".

It also advised "the key crossing should be redesigned".

As yet this has not happened although TfL says there will be changes before the start of the London Olympics in 2012.

The question from campaigners is why has it taken so long. They are also suggesting TfL has failed in its duty of care.

I was shown the problems with the junctions by Sophie Talbot, a local cyclist.

This TV piece shows very clearly the issues faced by cyclists.

I have spoken to TfL which says it is consulting on changes at three junctions at King's Cross that should be ready next year, and the designs will reflect the needs of all road users.

The police investigation has yet to report on what happened on 3 October. The incident room number is 0208 9985319.

I also noticed a lot of cyclists were walking their bikes through that junction - I presume because it is so daunting.

Do you use that junction?

 
Tom Edwards Article written by Tom Edwards Tom Edwards Transport correspondent, London

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  • rate this
    -6

    Comment number 6.

    Many, many cyclists in the area do not help themselves, however, by consistently crossing the red lights and riding in the dark with no lights, reflectors or light/reflective clothing.
    Only last night, I saw a man riding towards this same junction with no lights on his bike, and with headphones and sunglasses on, at 10pm. How can anyone think that is safe?

  • rate this
    -2

    Comment number 11.

    Why don't we wait for the police inquiry before allocating blame? Was the lorry driver to blame? Was the cyclist to blame? Was the junction to blame? How many other cyclists have died/injured at the junction? I suspect nobody here knows the answers to these questions but it appears that the cycling fraternity have already decided that the cyclist is innocent!!

  • rate this
    -2

    Comment number 14.

    @Beth A @JonoKenyon @ScaredAmoeba As a cyclist who uses this area almost every day, I'm simply pointing out that TfL are not the only ones with responsibility here.
    I ride with reflective vest and lights on at all times. Why? Because I'm more visible, the same reason that motorcycles have lights on during the day.
    Cyclists should do everything possible to make themselves as visible as possible.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 15.

    Visitors to Amsterdam are given ten top tips for cycling safely, including: 'Know where to ride', and 'See the signs'. "Not all Amsterdam streets are meant for cyclists," it says, "so 'winging it' without a route plan can be inefficient and dangerous."

    Not knowing where to ride was identified as a major obstacle in the TfL report, 'Who's in the peleton?' (comment 12). That's why TfL buried it.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 16.

    As a pedestrian in London, I find cyclists far worse than drivers (excepting cabbies). It's practically impossible to walk on the regent's canal these days due to the aggressive cyclists. I have the misfortune of living on a cycle route. The majority are arrogant and aggressive. London's unique brand of aggressive-cyclist need to take a good look at their own behaviour.

 

Comments 5 of 17

 

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